Archive for the ‘General News’ Category

The Supply Chain “Change” Dilemma!

Published December 15th, 2014 by Prasad Satyavolu 0 Comments

Trevor Miles and I have been having a healthy discussion on the Internet of Things and how these technology changes are shaping the way we work.

This is part 4 in our Internet of Things Series: The Supply Chain “Change” dilemma!

A few weeks ago, Charles Wehlage wrote a blog post on his take on The Innovators Dilemma. I thought his analogies with supply chain strategy and execution were spot on. In this piece, Clayton Christensen specifically focused on why organizations fail. And not just any organization, but the great ones! The key learning is that the individuals who as a team have just witnessed a big win as a result of a hard worked strategy are highly likely to miss the budding wave of disruptive forces and be ready for the next change.

My own experiences witsupply change dilemna Svyantek DeShon System interface and hierarchy of effortsh different large scale transformations certainly point to this valid the hypothesis. An organization’s capability to sustain its innovative streak is largely dependent on the organizational “software” a.k.a. human resource + DNA. Therefore, the dilemma is how to synchronize the “social dynamics” within an organization and lead continuous change as digital technologies evolve and their adoption is a necessity.

The graphic from Svyantek and DeShon’s thoughts on “System interface and hierarchy of efforts required for change in an organization” illustrates the complexity of change. Organizational software comes before process and technology.

 

supply change dilemna organizations as machine or living system

I equate corporates especially the supply chain organizations with living organisms. They evolve as new scenarios emerge, oil prices fluctuate, new suppliers are added, customers are acquired, new markets penetrated and more data and information becomes available. It is wrong to assume that the collective intelligence of a thinking group can be subsumed in the so-perceived “automated Internet of Things (IoT)” world. Also, pushing the organizational supply chain change issues to a set of mere “team building” workshops will not suffice either.

Information flow within an organization plays a critical role in creating a culture of transparency, commitment to shared goals and observable leadership behaviors. The microcosm of the organization is thus formed within each cell of the organization. The information flow through these cells or nodes spread out within and outside the organization’s supply network shall determine the sustainability of change. Can we leverage the IoT paradigm to create a different organizational culture?

For most global organizations, the supply chain as a system can perhaps be best characterized as geographically spread but comprising of interdependent elements guided and orchestrated by thousands of brains. Arguably, these supply chains are highly complex and difficult to change.

As technologies provide new opportunities for disruptive innovation, building a “learning organization”- along the lines of the model proposed by Peter Senge- could perhaps help in not getting caught in its own success. According to Senge:

‘learning organizations’ are those organizations where people continually expand their capacity to create the results they truly desire, where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nurtured, where collective aspiration is set free, and where people are continually learning to see the whole together.”

He argues that only those organizations that are able to adapt quickly and effectively will be able to excel in their field or market.

So, when Trevor and I started discussing the impact of Internet of Things on the Supply Chain; it soon became clear that we are looking at a massive opportunity for transformation. The path to realization will require balancing the communication, computing and control with human intervention on one hand and building a continuously learning organization on the other.

What are your thoughts on this matter? Comment and let us know.

Posted in Demand management, General News, Inventory management, Supply chain collaboration, Supply chain management


Your supply chain is costing you money – Reason #10 Failure to adequately train your supply chain planning staff

Published December 12th, 2014 by John Westerveld 0 Comments

Supply chain career pathOver the years, working for and with numerous manufacturing companies, I’ve seen many supply chain practices that cost companies money.  Over the next several weeks, I’ll outline these issues and discuss some ideas around how to avoid these practices. You can find the previous posts here:

Reason #10: Failure to adequately train your supply chain planning staff

When you think about it, your supply chain planning team is responsible for making decisions that can impact millions of dollars. A bad decision can result in missed orders, significant inventory, or scrapped materials.

Yet, when you look at the background of many supply chain planning workers, you’ll find a huge variation in education and experience. From people with a basic education that worked their way up from the shop floor, to people with engineering degrees that fell into supply chain planning, to business majors who have never been to the factory floor, to recent graduates with a supply chain planning background, but don’t have real-life experience on how manufacturing and supply chains work.

Having worked with a cross section of these people, I’ve seen the very best and the very worst. The very best include people that not only understand supply chain from end-to-end, but can also come up with creative solutions beyond what the typical supply chain education can prepare you for.

The worse have me wondering why they decided on a career in supply chain at all.  These are the planners that don’t know and don’t care how supply chain works. They do their jobs moving inventory from here to there, opening orders that the system says should be opened, cancelling orders that the system says should be cancelled, yet never questioning why or whether it makes sense.

Why is this a problem?  Lesupply chain management training t’s look at a quick example. Have you ever seen a situation where some result from a system– whether a bill from the phone company, a stock report or MRP recommended actions have been messed up?  It might be a programmatic error but more likely it is caused by bad data.  So imagine that you are a supply planner and the MRP report is telling you to increase orders 10x for an expensive component.  Do you do it?  The computer told you to, right?  If you are one of those planners that just blindly execute what the system says to do, then you probably would order it.  However, better supply chain planners might question that recommendation.  They use their knowledge of how planning systems work to peg up to find the source of the change and determine that someone changed the wrong record causing the change and confirm with the planner that the change was intended.  By doing this, they could potentially save the company millions of dollars in excess inventory.

There will always be people that just want to do things the way they always have. Don’t want training and aren’t interested in learning.  However, there are also those people who have a real drive to learn and would like to understand supply chain better. These are the folks you want to do everything in your power to give them the education they need.

While traditional supply chain training isn’t the only way to get really good at supply chain (I’ve met some planners that instinctively “got” supply chain – and knew their way around the system better than most) it certainly helps to have a good foundational knowledge of supply chain concepts.  One very good source of supply chain training is APICs (American Production and Inventory Control Society).  They have multiple resources as well as two certification programs; CPIM (Certified in Production Inventory Management) and CSCP (Certified Supply Chain Professional). CPIM is broken out in to 5 modules that each have an optional instructor led review course.  At the end of each module, the student is encouraged to write the exam.  Once all 5 exams have been passed, you achieve your CPIM certification.  CSCP consists of three workshops followed by an exam for certification.  Many companies have paid for their employees to achieve their certification and some have even brought instructors into the workplace to do the certification training there.  In reality, providing training in this way is a win-win for the company and the employee. The company gains by having better educated planners, the employee gains by having a certification that is recognized my many companies around the world.

Supply chain is a very complex world. Yet, it’s one place where practitioners can have a huge effect on the business yet have minimal education…and I really think that’s kind of cool!  But your supply chain team could be much more effective if given the right tools and some basic supply chain education.

How did you learn about supply chain?  Do you have any education advice for people just starting out and wanting to learn?  Comment back and let us know!

 

Posted in General News, Products, Response Management, Sales and operations planning (S&OP), Supply chain management


Kinexions, a tale of growth and potential

Published December 9th, 2014 by Trevor Miles @milesahead 0 Comments

building-kinexions-trevor-milesI’m on my way back from Tokyo where I attended our user conference, Kinexions Tokyo, in Japan, just 5 weeks after our Kinexions North America user conference in San Diego. As a side note, I had a stunning view of Mount Fuji from my hotel room on two of the three days I was in Tokyo. I have become so lazy about carrying a camera with me that I could only capture this photo with my smart phone.

If attendance at both conferences is anything to go by, 2015 is going to be even busier than 2014. In both cases we had about 50% increase in attendance over last year. In both cases we had the largest contingent of prospects ever and the largest contingent of partners ever. We also had the most customer presentations with 11 case studies in total including:

• ASICS
• Avaya
• Buffalo Technologies
• Dow AgroSciences
• Keysights
• Schneider Electric
• TE Connectivity
• Qualcomm

Kinexions `14 graphic recording

Kinexions graphic recording

The diagram above captures the essential elements of the San Diego conference in which you can see how important the customer case stories were to the overall conference. What struck me most is the diversity of the industries and the breadth of supply chain maturity represented. Before I comment further on specific stories, let me state that while the destination reached is important, it is the distance traveled that most impresses me. In other words, while I love the stories of the customers that are doing amazing stuff, it is the one that changed the most that really impresses me. For example, you only have to look at the Gartner Top 25 to see that Apple has been number one for the past 5 or so years. Yawn. I’m always looking for the companies that have started low in the ranking and are making rapid progress up the ranking. Change is hard, but change is necessary. It is easy to follow, and a lot more difficult to lead. Or, as Angel Mendez of Cisco likes to say, yesterday’s stretch goal is today’s benchmark.

And our customers are leading the charge in the transformation of supply chain, which is captured nicely in our tagline of ‘Know Sooner, Act Faster’. At the conference, that transformation was captured best by a pharmaceutical manufacturer and Schneider Electric. Their industries couldn’t be more different and their product portfolios and supply chain structures couldn’t be more different. But both were faced with deteriorating market positions a few years back that have necessitated huge transformations in their organizations, with supply chain being at the heart of the change. The pharmaceutical manufacturer was facing a massive patent cliff with many small molecule blockbuster drugs reaching patent expiry and have now made a radical shift into biotechnology. Schneider Electric has grown by acquisition and was faced with shrinking margins because of inefficient and poorly thought out supply chain operating models. Both companies needed to do something radically different. They both chose Kinaxis as the enabler of that change. Both realized that they could not transform their organizations by following the 1990’s supply chain mental model of functional optimization. You can’t cross the Grand Canyon in 10 min by walking. You need a helicopter for that.

Schneider said it best: The speed at which information flows across the supply chain is more important than what gets done with the information at each node in the chain. Now, to be honest, in my opinion they are expressing the area in which they had to make the largest mental leap, the greatest transformation. I would reword Schneider’s statement to state that the speed of information flow is just as important as what gets done in each functional box. In fact, I am not much of a fan of simple visibility solutions. What really matters is the speed of decision making, and that takes more than transmitting information quickly or being able to calculate quickly. You need both. This is the ‘Know Sooner’ part. And you need a third element too. You need to be able to bring people together as a team to make trade-off decisions quickly, as well as capture all the assumptions and provide a full audit trail of the decisions made. This is the ‘Act Faster’ part.

To be honest, our customers typically find it easier to describe the barriers to change and the inefficiencies of their previous operating models, than the new capabilities adopted. And this is true for most companies, and is where Avaya comes into the story, and to some extent Buffalo Technologies. Avaya have turned the value pyramid on its ear to focus on the real value generation of prediction/action/innovation. Dick Ling, the ‘father’ of S&OP said it best: It is far better to be approximately right than precisely wrong. Your data is never going to be 100% correct. You processes are always going to be in flux. Move on. Focus on how people will use the information you have to make a decision that will drive the company forward. At some point speed is quality. Plan. Monitor. Respond. In days, not months. By focusing on speed of decision, and quality of decision, Avaya has posted some truly amazing financial and operational gains. Obviously it is up to Avaya to share these gains publicly.

Avaya Kinaxis supply chain conference slides

Josh Greenbaum wrote a great summary of his impressions of the Kinexions conference in San Diego, specifically the unusually high number of women in attendance. Josh makes the point that it is perhaps our focus on supplier collaboration that draws more women to Kinaxis. If that is true, it is a most welcomed side benefit. To be honest I do think women are better at driving consensus and making compromises through trade-offs. Whether this is true because of nature or nurture is far beyond the scope of this discussion. What is important is the realization that the speed and manner in which people reach agreement across competing objectives is really important, and that it is a consensual process. If women are better at this, then all the more reason to bring them into senior leadership roles to drive change. We need the change. And we need more women in supply chain.

In wrapping up, let me give a quick shout-out to Watanabe-san of Abeam Consulting who presented the keynote in Japan. I ran a panel in San Diego discussing the technology innovations that will drive change in supply chain management. This was theme of Watanabe-san’s presentation, but he did a much better job of giving concrete examples of how these technology changes have already made changes to supply chains. My only (admittedly selfish) wish was that he has used English slides. I could only follow along on the simultaneous translation. For example, he used IKEA as an example of crowd sourcing in supply chain. After all, they are relying on the ‘crowd’ to do the final assembly, which has a radical impact on their cost to manufacture, distribute, and sell their products. What I found interesting was the manner in which he made new terms familiar and less alien, and therefore easier to accept and adopt.

So, all in all, a really positive set of conferences providing a great launch pad for 2015.

 

Posted in General News, Milesahead, Miscellanea, Pharma and life sciences supply chain management, Supply Chain Events


On-demand Webcast: Continuous S&OP for Life Sciences – Breaking the Mold

Published December 5th, 2014 by Melissa Clow 0 Comments

Today’s Friday post is to let you know that we have posted the on-demand version of last week’s webcast on “Continuous S&OP for Life Sciences – Breaking the Mold” (registration required). In this webcast, learn about the unique S&OP challenges for Life Sciences companies, the importance of changing S&OP mindsets, and how to break the S&OP mold from both a process and technology perspective.

Webcast: Continuous S&OP for Life Sciences - Breaking the Mold

 

You can also view the slides that we’ve posted to slideshare:

 

Webcast Abstract
Trevor MilesView the recording of Trevor Miles, VP of Thought Leadership, Kinaxis, as he presents on the following topic.

Business realities have changed so tremendously in the last thirty years that the traditional ‘plan then execute’ S&OP model has become highly ineffective. It is unable to facilitate decision making amid acutely complex supply chain networks, or within the time horizons required. This is particularly true for Life Sciences companies faced with varying regulatory requirements and aging product portfolios.

In response, there is an emerging recognition that operational information must be accessed and evaluated on a continuous basis, whereby decisions that may have once only been considered as part of a scheduled S&OP process can be made as needed throughout the cycle. In this capacity, process execution evolves into operational orchestration.

Watch the recording >>

 

Posted in General News, Milesahead, Pharma and life sciences supply chain management, Sales and operations planning (S&OP), Supply Chain Events, Supply chain management


Your supply chain is costing you money – Reason #9: Relentless pursuit of one metric at the expense of other metrics.

Published December 3rd, 2014 by John Westerveld 0 Comments

supply chain metric

Over the years, working for and with numerous manufacturing companies, I’ve seen many supply chain practices that cost companies money. Over the next several weeks, I’ll outline these issues and discuss some ideas around how to avoid these practices.

You can find the previous posts here:

Reason #9 Relentless pursuit of one supply chain metric at the expense of other metrics

Imagine that your child brings home their report card and it’s a mix of good and fair grades.  You tell them that the only grade that matters is their geography mark.  You tell them that you expect an A in geography – and you don’t care what happens to their Math grade.  History? Don’t care.  Social studies?  Pshaw.  Just focus on geography and forget about anything else.  Sound ridiculous? It should.  Yet, these are similar instructions as what is passed down to the supply chain from executives focused on a specific supply chain metric.

One example that I’ve seen several times is around inventory targets.  The typical example is as follows;

  • A company uses complex software to model the supply chain considering a desired customer service level, lead time data, and statistical analysis of supply and demand variability.
  • This software then calculates the statistically correct, time phased safety stock levels across multiple levels of the supply chain, providing the optimum inventory in the optimum location.
  • If you sum this inventory across all locations, it represents the minimum inventory needed to achieve the desired service level given the current capabilities of the supply chain.
  • The executive team then provides the supply chain planning team with new inventory targets that are (of course) much lower than those values calculated by the inventory optimization tools.
  • The supply chain team then ramps down the inventory to the new target and responds to the inevitable stock-outs by expediting short materials and shipments.
  • The result is a lower inventory level, but much higher expedited costs and reduced customer service.

Why do companies focus on reducing a specific metric?  There can be multiple reasons. Some of the more likely are;

  • A metric (like inventory performance) is monitored by financial analysts and therefore tied to stock valuation.
  • A single metric has been performing poorly and the company wants to focus on improving that metric.
  • For the Dilbert lovers – Someone on the executive team has read an article/book espousing the importance of one metric or another (it happens more often than you’d think!).

The idea of focusing on a specific goal can indeed accelerate progress towards achieving that goal.  The problem is that nothing exists in a vacuum and if you are not careful, other metrics that you are not watching can degrade significantly.   For example, if your goal is improved customer service, the easiest way to achieve that is to a) increase safety stocks and b) increase expediting to ensure orders are delivered on time.  The next time you look at your metrics, you’ll see an improvement in on-time delivery, but you’ll also see an increase in inventory levels and operations costs due to expediting.

Things can get even crazier when individual departments have conflicting goals:

  • One group is rewarded for improved fulfillment rates while another group is rewarded for inventory reduction.
  • One group is increasing safety stocks to improve fulfillment rates while the other is trying to reduce them to cut inventory.

Sometimes laser focus on a specific goal is necessary to turn around a particularly bad metric.  However, for most a more measured approach is suggested.  There are a number of techniques and tools that can help drive improvements across the company;

1)      Systemic continuous improvement tools.  These are many and varied.  CQI, TQM, Six-Sigma, Lean, etc.  They all look at your enterprise as a whole, find waste and eliminate it. As an example, let’s look at lean and more specifically the one-less-at-a-time approach to inventory reduction.  This approach reduces the inventory in a system very gradually.  The idea here is that inventory is used as a buffer and acts to hide problems in the supply chain.  By slowing reducing inventory, you can identify those problems and solve them.  Inventory needed because of long lead time?  Find ways to reduce lead time.  Inventory needed due to sporadic demand? Find ways to reduce demand variability?  Inventory due to large lot sizes?  Find ways to reduce lot sizes through setup reduction on manufactured parts or through different contracts around purchased parts.  In this way, inventory reduction can happen without impacting other metrics like on-time delivery and operations costs.  In fact, by using this approach, on-time delivery and operations metrics often improve, while reducing inventory!

2)      Balanced scorecards.  Balanced scorecards consider multiple metrics, often with weighting and targets.  They report an overall score that considers all of these metrics. With a balanced scorecard, you can emphasize one metric over the others by giving it a higher weighting.  The key difference is that you are aware of the impact you are having on the other metrics because they are shown in the same scorecard.

3)      Balanced scorecards as decision support.  No, I’m not cheating by calling out balanced scorecards twice. (well…. maybe a bit). Here’s the thing.  When you combine balanced scorecards with an advanced planning tool that allows you to create multiple scenarios, some real magic can happen.  Imagine a balanced scorecard where you not only see what your performance has been, but you can see multiple simulation scenarios as well.  Now imagine if this balanced scorecard presented an overall score for each scenario.  Picking a course of action is as simple as looking at the scores for each scenario.  Finally, imagine if anyone in your planning team could have access to this power for each decision they need to make.  Suddenly, decisions are being made that consider the overall impact on the organization, not just against a single metric.

supply chain software balanced scorecards as decision support

A company does not succeed based on a single metric.  It takes a balanced approach and awareness of all aspects of your business to achieve success.   When targeting a specific metric for improvement, look for ways to improve that metric without negatively impacting others. It can be done and when it is, very often you’ll find that you improve the metric you are focused on and the others at the same time. 

Have you see examples where a company has focused on a single metric at the costs of all others?  What was the impact?

Comment back and let us know!

 

Posted in General News, Sales and operations planning (S&OP), Supply chain collaboration, Supply chain management


Overcoming the Challenges to Achieving End-to-End Supply Chain Visibility

Published December 1st, 2014 by Melissa Clow 2 Comments

Supply chain visibility alone won’t yield effective supply chain orchestration; it is a prerequisite capability, among others.

The 2014 Strategic Road Map for Supply Chain Visibility research recently conducted by Gartner (and included in our new Supply Chain Visibility: Envisioning the Broader Need paper), describes the current state of maturity as it relates to visibility, as follows:

“Most supply chain organizations are at Stage 2 or 3 of supply chain maturity, and thus have an inside-out view of supply chain plans, events and data. Their current visibility capabilities are most likely departmental or functional and focus separately on data and processes for planning and execution.”1

Overcoming the Challenges to Achieving End-to-End Supply Chain VisibilityThe defined maturity model consists of five stages, which means there is plenty of opportunity for organizations to make improvements in their supply chains to enhance visibility. The ultimate goal is to have visibility into not just to what is happening within your own company but extended to all areas of your supply chain, including partners. This is the shift from an inside-out to an outside-in focus. Stage 5 also entails achieving visibility across supply chain planning and execution. Attaining this level of visibility is obviously no small feat.

As supply chains get longer and more global, there has been a significant increase in the number of supply chain nodes that need to be connected and the volume of data moving among these nodes. The complexity associated with connecting these nodes – both those internal and external to the organization – is a barrier to end-to-end supply chain visibility. Data harmonization across multiple systems of record also adds another layer of complexity.

Despite these challenges, it is possible for organizations to achieve the higher levels of visibility outlined in Gartner’s model. And the benefits – which many believe include a more agile, resilient, competitive and profitable supply chain – are worth the effort.

If you are looking to establish critical supply chain visibility capabilities and progress towards higher levels in the visibility maturity model, our new paper entitled Supply Chain Visibility: Envisioning the Broader Need, is a worthwhile read. Featuring research from Gartner, the paper sheds more light on the complexities surrounding the attainment of supply chain visibility and provides a strategic roadmap for supply chain visibility initiatives. Download your copy today, as it is only be available for a limited time.

 

1Titze C., Payne T., Sarangdhar V., Devereux, P.; Gartner; 2014 Strategic Road Map for Supply Chain Visibility Initiatives; 8 September 2014

Posted in Demand management, Gartner Supply Chain Managment, General News, Sales and operations planning (S&OP), Supply chain management


Kinexions: Is “User Conference” the Right Description?

Published November 28th, 2014 by Bill DuBois 0 Comments

Being a presales consultant (…by day, Late Late Supply Chain Show host by night) during the last quarter of the year, there’s little, if any, time to reflect back on what was the most successful user conference in Kinaxis history. To be honest, my reflections didn’t start until I read Josh Greenbaum’s post, “Women of the Supply Chain: Responsibility, Collaboration and Bathroom Lines”.

Kinexions is supply chain user conference the right descriptionMy first thought was “hey, there’ll be no collaboration in the bathroom” but then I realized he was referring to the gender ratio at the conference. Josh used the longer lines to the ladies restroom as a way to highlight the higher ratio of women at Kinexions.  I didn’t want to be the one to tell Josh that ladies go to the bathroom in pairs so that line would be double by default. Even so, Josh noted that ratio came in somewhat higher than the tech average at 23% but judging from this picture I would have guessed it was 50/50.

The heart of Josh’s post called out the reasons way women make great supply chain leaders. Josh quoted Trevor Miles as observing “women appear to be better at cooperation and collaboration and to be more open to alternative points of view, all skills that are valued in the supply chain world.”  Josh’s article got me thinking about the other groups that were there and made me question if the description “user conference” is the best way to describe Kinexions.

Doug Colbeth Kinexions supply chain user conferenceAs Kinaxis CEO Doug Colbeth stated in his opening remarks, it all starts with the customers and nothing is possible in our world without our customers. We logically think customer equals user which equals person hitting the keyboard and managing their supply chains with RapidResponse. However, there were people from the customer base that were non-users. For example, executives, who reap the benefits of a more profitable supply chain, or members from the IT community who can be more responsive to user requests but are not necessarily users themselves. The term user just seemed to leave a few people out. Doug also put to bed many misconceptions about Kinexions. For anyone who has googled the term Kinexions, it’s not a spa or an online dating site for supply chain professionals!? Thanks Doug!

Kinexions software companyThe second group was a unique one: prospects. Kinaxis is the only software company I know of that would let potential customers walk the halls freely and mingle with current customers. You couldn’t tell the difference between existing and potential customers as they had free access to all sessions. I don’t think Josh could have pointed out the prospects in the bathroom lines. Certainly there were break-out sessions designed for the more experienced user but we found those prospects looking for as much detail as they could get in these sessions. Do we now call it a “User and Wanna Be User Conference”?

Kinexions supply chain user conference analystsThe third group to note was partners. There has never been a higher level of participation from Kinaxis partners at Kinexions. We saw them on stage in the main session, hosting their own break-out sessions and in booths set up in the halls which allowed anyone to go a bit deeper on their offerings. This group has a mountain of user, deployment and supply chain strategy experience. Again, these groups are delivering value to the user community but are not users. The term user just got diluted even more. Partners are a vital member of the Kinaxis community so perhaps we should rename Kinexions to the “User and Partner Conference.”

Let’s move onto the fourth group: analysts. I’ll group both the supply chain and financial analysts together for this conversation. Obviously not users, this group is there to dig into the real user story. Sometimes it’s like playing a round of golf with a golf instructor. They’ve seen it all before so the only thing you can do is relax and swing like nobody’s watching. It’s the only way to get the most from this group in terms of feedback, insights and suggestions for improvement. We’re now up to the “User/Partner and Analyst Conference.”

Kinexions supply chain user conference marketingThe final group of “non-users” is the Kinaxis employees. All levels of sales, marketing, development and services were represented at Kinexions. Here’s a little known secret, for the staff of Kinaxis this is likely the most valuable event of the year. There is nothing like hearing firsthand how customers are maximizing the benefits of their RapidResponse deployments and validating those success stories with partners and analysts. I don’t think we can go with the “User, Partner, Analyst and Employee Conference.” However the theme of Kinexions for the last several years has been “Learn, Laugh, Share and Connect.” Perhaps the connotation of the term “user conference” should change to reflect the experience and not a single group of attendees. If you have ever logged onto the Kinaxis Community you’ll notice the “Learn, Laugh, Share and Connect” banner. So, my suggestion is that next year we refer to Kinexions as the Kinaxis Community Conference. Regardless of the tag line, everyone at Kinaxis is looking forward to Kinexions 2015. Hope to see you there!

 

Posted in General News, Inventory management, Sales and operations planning (S&OP), Supply Chain Events, Supply chain management


Kinaxis on the road: 12th American Supply Chain & Logistics Summit

Published November 27th, 2014 by Melissa Clow 0 Comments
SCL Summit

The American Supply Chain and Logistics Summit, now in its 12th year, brings together senior executives from across the Supply Chain and Logistics fields to enjoy an unbeatable mix of networking, expert case studies, interactive debates and master classes over three exceptional days.

Join Benji Green, Director of Global Sales, Operations, Supply and Inventory Planning at Avaya for the Kinaxis supply chain optimization workshop on December 9th. Register using the link below to receive 25% off your registration.

December 8-10, 2014
Dallas, Texas

Learn More and Register for the Summit

Schedule Meeting

 

Posted in General News, Pharma and life sciences supply chain management, Sales and operations planning (S&OP), Supply chain collaboration, Supply Chain Events, Supply chain management