Posts categorized as 'Pharma and life sciences supply chain management'

A perfect supply chain?

MattBenson
  • by Matt Benson
  • Published

Dabbawala supply chainIf your 3PL supply chain problem was to deliver 400,000 items daily from supplier to customer and your on-time in full metric was a six-sigma target standard of 1 failure per million, how would you do it?

What If I was to also constrain the resources you had at your disposal and said you only had 5000 transportation vehicles and your delivery slot was just 1 hour and that your delivery window was always 12pm until 1pm? What if I was then to say that you had no technology at your disposal to manage it and your only transportation methods were bicycles, trains and feet and you had to do it on a budget of 33 cents per delivery?

Well, that’s what the Dabbawalas in India have been doing in Mumbai for over 100 years – delivering meals direct to workers and school desks from the family home with an OTIF of 99.99 %. They don’t use technology but what they do have is a tried and trusted set of highly efficient robust procedures that govern how they manage their work. It’s a methodology that has been established and passed down from generation to generation and has stood the test of time.

So, why don’t organisations with similar problems just invest time in improving their working procedures? Why do we even need technology? Well, the answer in reality is that we really do need both – not all of our problems are only 3PL issues with supply chains having such stable demand signals – same item, same quantity, to the same customer, pretty much every day. Not all of our supply chains have a zero inventory, stable sub-contracted supply – it’s a relatively quick production process to make an Indian meal (2-3 hours), freshly cooked every day often using Tandoor ovens. In addition, the majority of our distribution networks are geographically wider and much more complex.

Away from Mumbai we’re at the PIMS conference this week in London discussing Pharmaceutical supply chain problems with some key players in the market. The common themes we are hearing are:

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A Brief Report on the Pharmaceutical Innovation in Manufacturing Summit

HansVelthuizen

This week I attended the 5th Annual Pharmaceutical Innovation in Manufacturing Summit near Heathrow. Although the conference was situated in the Edwardian style Radisson hotel neatly decorated with Persian rugs, brass-railed staircases and chandeliers, the location stood in sharp contrast with the innovative character of the Summit.

The objective of the summit was to provide an open forum for highly insightful presentations that span a broad range of topics critical to the biologics field. It was a two-day gathering dedicated to cutting edge technology, innovation and strategy across the entire small molecule & biopharmaceutical manufacturing process.

As good as the sessions were, I always find the networking opportunities the most useful at these kinds of summits. There was plenty of room during dinners and lunch breaks to discuss new ideas with industry peers. Seeing a lot of familiar faces you realize that the pharmaceutical supply chain is a small world.

Distinctive of this summit was the wide variety of topics and themes that passed these two days. Topics that were discussed ranged from strategic supply chain challenges to operational packaging and labeling processes and techniques. While there are undoubtedly some topics relevant for each participant, it seemed very well possible this broad setup of event missed its goal.

Kinaxis was present with a booth and Laura Dionne, Senior Director, Worldwide Operations Planning at TriQuint gave a well-received presentation titled ‘A Healthy Dose of Chips: Supply Chain Lessons for Life Sciences’. In this presentation Laura discussed the similarities between pharmaceutical and Semiconductor supply chains and also the solutions that can be applied for addressing similar challenges.

triquint supply chain journey

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A Healthy Dose of Chips: Supply Chain Lessons for Life Sciences at the 2015 Pharmaceutical Innovation in Manufacturing Summit

MelissaClow
  • by Melissa Clow
  • Published

A quick post to let our readers know that we’ll be at the 2015 Pharmaceutical Innovation in Manufacturing Summit (PIMS). This year’s event will be held at the Radisson Blu Edwardian Hotel, London, February 10-11, 2015.

If you plan to attend the conference, join Laura Dionne, Senior Director, Worldwide Operations Planning, TriQuint as she presents Laura DionneA Healthy Dose of Chips: Supply Chain Lessons for Life Sciences from a High Tech Veteran’ on Tuesday, February 10th at 2:15pm.

Session Details

What can a lifelong Semiconductor Supply Chain expert have to say about Pharmaceuticals? A surprising amount it seems! In this presentation we will explore the similarities between these supply chains and also the solutions that can be applied for addressing these challenges.

Laura Dionne, a 33 year Semiconductor Veteran and supply chain change agent will discuss the commonalities including the challenge of planning a wealth of products that can be manufactured from a singular base material, how quality creates an underlying tension that drives customer fulfillment and margins, and also how inventory strategy can make the difference between profit and loss. Cross over of experts between industries is not anything new to the supply chain, but few would recognize what can be learned about the two industries that have shaped the global supply chain… Pharmaceuticals and Semiconductors.

We’ll be posting Laura’s presentation deck along with a recap of the conference, so stay tuned!

Happy Monday all!

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Kinexions, a tale of growth and potential

TrevorMiles
  • by Trevor Miles
  • Published

building-kinexions-trevor-milesI’m on my way back from Tokyo where I attended our user conference, Kinexions Tokyo, in Japan, just 5 weeks after our Kinexions North America user conference in San Diego. As a side note, I had a stunning view of Mount Fuji from my hotel room on two of the three days I was in Tokyo. I have become so lazy about carrying a camera with me that I could only capture this photo with my smart phone.

If attendance at both conferences is anything to go by, 2015 is going to be even busier than 2014. In both cases we had about 50% increase in attendance over last year. In both cases we had the largest contingent of prospects ever and the largest contingent of partners ever. We also had the most customer presentations with 11 case studies in total including:

• ASICS
• Avaya
• Buffalo Technologies
• Dow AgroSciences
• Keysights
• Schneider Electric
• TE Connectivity
• Qualcomm

Kinexions `14 graphic recording

Kinexions graphic recording

The diagram above captures the essential elements of the San Diego conference in which you can see how important the customer case stories were to the overall conference. What struck me most is the diversity of the industries and the breadth of supply chain maturity represented. Before I comment further on specific stories, let me state that while the destination reached is important, it is the distance traveled that most impresses me. In other words, while I love the stories of the customers that are doing amazing stuff, it is the one that changed the most that really impresses me. For example, you only have to look at the Gartner Top 25 to see that Apple has been number one for the past 5 or so years. Yawn. I’m always looking for the companies that have started low in the ranking and are making rapid progress up the ranking. Change is hard, but change is necessary. It is easy to follow, and a lot more difficult to lead. Or, as Angel Mendez of Cisco likes to say, yesterday’s stretch goal is today’s benchmark.

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On-demand Webcast: Continuous S&OP for Life Sciences – Breaking the Mold

MelissaClow
  • by Melissa Clow
  • Published

Today’s Friday post is to let you know that we have posted the on-demand version of last week’s webcast on “Continuous S&OP for Life Sciences – Breaking the Mold” (registration required). In this webcast, learn about the unique S&OP challenges for Life Sciences companies, the importance of changing S&OP mindsets, and how to break the S&OP mold from both a process and technology perspective.

Webcast: Continuous S&OP for Life Sciences - Breaking the Mold

 

You can also view the slides that we’ve posted to slideshare…

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Kinaxis on the road: 12th American Supply Chain & Logistics Summit

MelissaClow
  • by Melissa Clow
  • Published
SCL Summit

The American Supply Chain and Logistics Summit, now in its 12th year, brings together senior executives from across the Supply Chain and Logistics fields to enjoy an unbeatable mix of networking, expert case studies, interactive debates and master classes over three exceptional days.

Join Benji Green, Director of Global Sales, Operations, Supply and Inventory Planning at Avaya for the Kinaxis supply chain optimization workshop on December 9th. Register using the link below to receive 25% off your registration.

December 8-10, 2014
Dallas, Texas

Learn More and Register for the Summit

Schedule Meeting

 

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Mentoring, Sponsorship and Quotas: What are their relative merits in bringing more women into supply chain management?

MelissaClow
  • by Melissa Clow
  • Published

Next week, June 5, 2014, we are excited to host a webcast on women in supply chain management.

We have a fantastic panel of accomplished female supply chain practitioners as well as industry expert Lora Cecere serving as the moderator. Register for the webcast to hear them discuss the thorny issues of mentoring, sponsorship, and quotas as mechanisms to get more women into supply chain, and the relative merits and drawbacks of these approaches.

Mentoring, Sponsorship, & Quotas: What are their relative merits in bringing more women into supply chain management?

Event Details:
Mentoring, Sponsorship, & Quotas: What are their relative merits in bringing more women into supply chain management?
Date: Thursday, June 5, 2014
Time: 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM ET

There is a consensus that since women constitute over half of the workforce but just 10% of top supply chain executive positions in Fortune Global 500 companies that something needs to be done to address this imbalance. While a great deal of attention gets placed on the ‘glass ceiling’ concept, there are a lot of women who face barriers and discrimination at mid and entry level positions too. There is a clear social responsibility need and this panel will focus on the practical advantages to having more women in supply chain including:

  • Do women and men make decisions differently? If so, why does this matter to supply chain?
  • Has supply chain become more relevant to women as a career option?
  • What does a career path look like for women in supply chain?

Reserve your spot!

P A N E L I S T S :
Verda Blythe, Director, Grainger Center for Supply Chain Management, Wisconsin School of Business
Laura Dionne, Director, Worldwide Operations Planning, TriQuint
Elisabeth Kaszas, Director, Supply Chain, Amgen Inc.
Shellie Molina, VP, Global Supply Chain, First Solar

M O D E R A T O R :
Lora Cecere, Founder, Supply Chain Insights

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7 Life Sciences Supply Chain Processes That Require an Integrated Approach

TrevorMiles
  • by Trevor Miles
  • Published

The emerging or intensifying industry dynamics that I discussed in an earlier blog post,, along with significant shifts in strategy, are having a direct and material impact on the way Life Sciences supply chains must operate. The compounded effect of a host of complexity drivers is creating the need for supply chain transformation. By satisfying the following seven supply chain processes in an integrated manner, Life Sciences teams will be better equipped for success in today’s new, complex world.

  1. Collaborative launch management – clinical, regulatory and commercial
  2. Jurisdictional control to respect regulatory needs during planning
  3. Consensus demand planning across affiliates and countries
  4. Risk evaluation and recovery to deal with shortages and FDA shutdowns
  5. Shortage analysis and reporting for FDASIA compliance
  6. Supply and capacity planning to balance demand across regions
  7. Expiry management to balance long supply lead times and shifting demand

Let’s take a look at each of these in more detail.

Coordinated Launches

The effective launch of a new product is critically important in any industry, but it is of particular importance in the Life Sciences industry given the long time it takes to bring a new drug to market from discovery through clinical trials and commercialization, with regulatory oversight and conformance throughout the process. When the ‘long tail’ trend is coupled with shorter patent protection, the margin and market captured during the early launch period will be crucial to the recovery of the R&D investment, and thus the pressure to streamline and coordinate clinical trials and the regulatory process with the commercial launch has become intense.

Revenue Trends throughout the Product Life Cycle

phamacutical supply chain graph

Jurisdictional Control

In addition, mandates by regulatory bodies require jurisdictional control of demand satisfaction

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