Posts categorized as 'Supply chain management'

Video: Schneider Electric Charts an End-to-End Supply Chain Roadmap

MelissaClow
  • by Melissa Clow
  • Published

Does your organization have a massive worldwide supply chain network? A diverse IT landscape? These were some of the challenges Schneider Electric was facing. Their network is made of about 250 factories, about 100 distribution centers, various IT systems and a significant number of products.

The company decided they wanted to build an extended visibility network to be able to better address customers, deliver products on time, and move from reactive supply chain to a proactive one.

Watch now: Schneider Electric Charts an End-to-End Supply Chain Roadmap

Schneider Electric Charts an End-to-End Supply Chain Roadmap

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Before Adopting a Supply Chain Planning System of Record, Consider This

MelissaClow
  • by Melissa Clow
  • Published

Supply Chain Planning System of Record

Supply chain functions have often been segmented into siloed activities specific to functional goals and that reflect organizational structure. Over the years, software has been designed, developed and deployed in the same isolated manner. In contrast to this approach, a supply chain planning (SCP) system of record (SOR) enables a company to ‘create, manage, link, align, collaborate and share its planning data across a supply chain’.1

More and more supply chain teams are recognizing the value this type of planning platform can bring to supporting their end-to-end supply chain networks. However, there are some key considerations to keep in mind when evaluating these solutions, such as:

  • Does it solve the fundamental challenges you face?
  • Is it providing something different from what you have?
  • What are your peers leveraging?
  • Is it uniquely and purposely designed for end-to-end supply chain management?
  • What ROI does it deliver?

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Video: Trinity Rail – Building a Sense-and-Respond Supply Chain

MelissaClow
  • by Melissa Clow
  • Published

How do you face uncertainty in your supply chain?

According to Mike Hegedus, vice president of supply chain management at Trinity Rail, one of the most difficult things a supply chain manager faces is uncertainty in the supply chain. In their business, there are so many different possibilities of train cars that can be built. And among those different car types, they’re customized in many ways for each customer – making it nearly impossible to forecast what the customer’s going to require.

Realizing that “the forecast is always wrong,” Trinity Rail opts instead to focus on creating a “sense-and-respond” supply chain, to deal with real-world developments in demand for transportation equipment.

In this video, Mike Hegedus explains how their ability to quickly satisfy those customer demands has improved since moving to a sense-and-respond operating model: “we get our executives from sales, operations, finance, and supply chain together on a weekly basis. And we review the demand situation to make decisions; very important decisions about how to handle these orders.” Having supply planning technology in place to have a flexible supply chain is an important component to make it possible to deliver on their business strategy.

Watch now: Trinity Rail – Building a Sense-and-Respond Supply Chain

Trinity Rail: Building a Sense-and-Respond Supply Chain

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Video: Amgen Transforms Its Supply Chain Planning

MelissaClow
  • by Melissa Clow
  • Published

Looking to transform your supply chain? Need some inspiration? In this video, Paul Collier, supply chain senior manager of Amgen, talks about the major initiatives that the company has undertaken to improve supply-chain planning, collaboration and regulatory compliance.

Amgen knew that the business was going to be coming into some major transformative change, in terms of international expansion and product candidates that were coming through for approvals. To make this transformation, they needed supply chain planning technology that would be able to respond to that transformative change in a fast, effectively and a quality manner.

Watch now: Amgen Transforms Its Supply-Chain Planning

Amgen Transforms Its Supply Chain Planning

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Tesla’s Big Gamble

AndrewDunbar

TeslaIf you’re a supply chain nerd like me, you’ve probably noticed that Tesla’s been making some pretty big waves in the auto industry. It seems Tesla is poised to be the first company to truly take advantage of a new market segment. People are looking for vehicles that are environmentally responsible, technologically advanced, safe, sexy, and affordable to the average Joe. Their new Model 3 meets all of this criteria, and has a range about double that of comparable vehicles. They’ve nailed the customer requirements so well that they’ve received over 320,000 pre-orders in the first week, even though deliveries aren’t slated to begin until the end of 2017.

To meet this demand, Tesla hopes to reach a production rate of 500,000 vehicles per year by 2020. Wait… what? 500K per year, but not until 2020? Even if they managed to accelerate their production schedule to achieve 500K per year at the end of 2017, they still have at least an 8 month backlog before they even deliver their first car. On the surface, this seems like an unprecedented supply chain challenge. Their level of success at building this new supply chain will make or break their business. To make it even harder, due to the incredible amount of money involved and the sex-appeal of the product, they’ll be undergoing their supply chain revolution with a level of public scrutiny normally limited to the latest iPhones!

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Video: What’s Driving Change in Supply Chain Management?

MelissaClow
  • by Melissa Clow
  • Published

How are companies meeting the challenge of big data, the Internet of Things and the need for change management? How does the big trends affect supply chain management?

In this video, hear a wide-ranging roundtable discussion with industry leaders about how companies are meeting the challenge of big data, the Internet of Things and the need for change management — all with the goal of improving the planning function and achieving end-to-end supply-chain visibility. This discussion features Mark Ramirez, chief technology officer with Trinity Rail; Josh Greenbaum, principal of Enterprise Applications Consulting, Trevor Miles, vice president of product innovation with Kinaxis; and Bob Bowman, managing editor of SupplyChainBrain.

Watch now: What’s Driving Change in Supply-Chain Planning?

What's Driving Change in Supply Chain Planning?

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Connecting the Supply Chain Dots

AlexaCheater

While recently watching a great video series featuring supply chain leaders from companies like Roland DG, Merck, Schneider Electric, TrinityRail, and more, one thing really stood out. The value of connecting the dots. Connecting the Supply Chain Dots

While connecting the multitude of dots in your value chain may seem like an insurmountable task, rest assured it can be done—and without pulling out all your hair in the process! These global enterprise companies are proof of that. But don’t let growing complexity in your own supply chain keep you from trying. By developing more agile processes and a better picture of your end-to-end supply chain, you’ll be able to quickly and confidently make the necessary decisions to support your business’s corporate goals.

What does it mean to connect the dots?

Connecting the dots means being able to draw a continuous line from one end of your supply chain all the way to the other—from customers to as far down the supplier network as you can get. It’s a complete look at both your upstream and downstream nodes, and also includes all your internal data steams coming from existing ERPs, distribution centers, factories, etc. But be warned, this isn’t about a one-way flow of information. Your relationship with your suppliers and customers should be symbiotic, with information passing freely back and forth, feeding into the same data pool—the same version of the truth—to ensure everything is on track and running smoothly, or provide the necessary details to analyze and course correct if it’s not.

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Design for the Supply Chain Pt 6: Unobtrusive

JonathanLofton

We’re continuing to reflect on the “10 Principles of Good Design” as applied to supply chain and supply chain management (Design for the Supply Chain). This week we’re talking about being able to use supply chain management tools in an uninhibited way.

Principle #5: Good design “Is unobtrusive”
Swiss army knife
“Products fulfilling a purpose are like tools. They are neither decorative objects nor works of art. Their design should therefore be both neutral and restrained, to leave room for the user’s self-expression.” – ‘Dieter Rams: ten principles for good design

I really like the idea of leaving room for the user’s self-expression. To me this means making sure there’s space for creativity and innovation (Principle #1). We need to have parameters or ‘guardrails’ in place to ensure that proper business process flow is occurring, otherwise it becomes hard to produce consistent results. On the other hand, we have exceptional professionals who are capable of bringing new ideas to bear on the supply chain design. We want the user to be able to take the designated management tools (e.g. reports, multi-dimensional analysis, dashboards, scorecards, etc.) and reconfigure them to see information in a way that makes the most sense to them individually (recall Principle #4). We also want the user to be able to create scenarios to experiment with various ideas about what can be changed to improve results.

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