Posts Tagged ‘Sales and operations planning’

On-demand Webcast: Continuous S&OP for Life Sciences – Breaking the Mold

Published December 5th, 2014 by Melissa Clow 0 Comments

Today’s Friday post is to let you know that we have posted the on-demand version of last week’s webcast on “Continuous S&OP for Life Sciences – Breaking the Mold” (registration required). In this webcast, learn about the unique S&OP challenges for Life Sciences companies, the importance of changing S&OP mindsets, and how to break the S&OP mold from both a process and technology perspective.

Webcast: Continuous S&OP for Life Sciences - Breaking the Mold

 

You can also view the slides that we’ve posted to slideshare:

 

Webcast Abstract
Trevor MilesView the recording of Trevor Miles, VP of Thought Leadership, Kinaxis, as he presents on the following topic.

Business realities have changed so tremendously in the last thirty years that the traditional ‘plan then execute’ S&OP model has become highly ineffective. It is unable to facilitate decision making amid acutely complex supply chain networks, or within the time horizons required. This is particularly true for Life Sciences companies faced with varying regulatory requirements and aging product portfolios.

In response, there is an emerging recognition that operational information must be accessed and evaluated on a continuous basis, whereby decisions that may have once only been considered as part of a scheduled S&OP process can be made as needed throughout the cycle. In this capacity, process execution evolves into operational orchestration.

Watch the recording >>

 

Posted in General News, Milesahead, Pharma and life sciences supply chain management, Sales and operations planning (S&OP), Supply Chain Events, Supply chain management


Your supply chain is costing you money – Reason #6 Not effectively managing inventory.

Published October 20th, 2014 by John Westerveld 4 Comments

Over the years, working for and with numerous manufacturing companies, I’ve seen many supply chain practices that cost companies money.  Over the next several weeks, I’ll outline these issues and discuss some ideas around how to avoid these practices. You can find the previous posts here:

Not effectively managing inventory.

Reason #6 Not effectively managing inventory

I had to throw out some carrots yesterday. I hate throwing food out but there was nothing to be done for it…all I can say is that I’m glad the carrots were in a bag….and it didn’t leak. That got me thinking about why I was throwing away what had been perfectly good food;

  • I had forecasted needing a certain amount, but the customers (my family) didn’t take what I’d forecasted.
  • I thought we would want carrots, but everyone wanted broccoli…which I didn’t have.
  • I lost track of how many carrots we had and ended up buying more when we really didn’t need any.
  • Spoilage can happen.  In the case of my carrots, there was a limited shelf life – but they could have been dropped or stolen (hey, it could happen!).

That was carrots.  All in all, it cost me a couple of dollars.  Unfortunately, all the same kinds of things can happen to your supply chain inventory.  Except that your inventory costs millions of dollars.

Those of you that manage inventories know how hard it can be to get the quantities just right.  If you maintain too little inventory, you have stockouts, line stoppages and unhappy customers.  If you have excess inventory, it ties up working capital and is at risk of damage and obsolescence.  The worst possible world is when you have too much of something you don’t need, and too little of something you do need.

So what strategies are out there to maintain inventories at the “right” level? There are many but let’s focus on some of the high runners;

  • Sales and Operations Planning – How many times have you seen this scenario play out? Marketing sees an opportunity and plans a huge promotion for Product B.  Operations is going full out building anticipation inventory for Product A because Product A’s demand always goes up this time of year. By the time operations realizes that marketing is promoting a different product, they already have too much inventory of Product A and don’t have enough time to make enough Product B to satisfy the demand driven by the promotion.   If this company had an effective S&OP process, operations and marketing would have been aligned as soon as Marketing had approved the promotion, and would have had the right amount of inventory of the right product.
  • Better forecasts – Forecasts are always wrong! True.  But sometimes they can be less wrong…and the more accurate your forecast, the more likely it is that you’ll be building the right quantity of the right products at the right time.  Forecasting is hard, however, advanced tools like statistical forecasting algorithms, collaborative forecasting tools and forecast accuracy measures and what-if scenarios helps guide demand planners to a more accurate set of numbers.
  • Lead time reductions – Supply chain improvements can actually help improve forecasting!  Well,actually it would reduce the impact of bad forecasting when you are a make to stock shop.  How does that work you ask?   Imagine you were asked to accurately predict the weather for this time next year.  Pretty tough right? What about six months from now….still hard. What about next week? Getting easier.  How about tomorrow?  No problem (usually)!  In a make to stock environment, if I have a 6 month cumulative lead time, my forecast is being used to buy inventory today for something I’m going to sell in 6 months.  If through process improvements, I can reduce my lead time to 2 months, my accuracy will be much better where it really matters; during my cumulative lead time.
  • Better/faster planning – While there are things you can (and should) do to improve your forecasts, you are never going to realize truly accurate forecasts.  For example, a surveyfrom 2012 showed that average forecast error by industry ranged from 15% for retail to 39% for manufacturing/industrial and consumer packaged goods. Forecast error for most other industries was around 30%.One of the problems with poor forecast accuracy is that today’s legacy systems are unable to respond fast enough to satisfy demand that is in excess of forecast.  This leads to a) higher than necessary inventory levels as we maintain higher inventories on those items with the highest variability and forecast error or b) lower than acceptable customer service. Neither are good results.

So how do we respond faster? There are multiple capabilities your demand system must have to allow faster response to demand fluctuations;

  1. Visibility across the enterprise – to be able to respond effectively, your planning system must contain all data across all plants, regardless of the source system. Responding quickly means knowing what you have and what you don’t have.  If you have to wait hours or days to get a report off a remote system, you can’t respond.
  2. Always on analytics – Imagine creating an excel model but every time you made a change, you had to wait 6 hours to see the impact.   It wouldn’t be very useful, right? Yet this is what we accept from our ERP systems every day. To simulate effectively, you need to be able to see the result of a change as soon as that change is made.  Not only must the calculations be fast (seconds not hours) but the calculations must be configurable enough to allow you to model ERP results from any ERP system (what’s the point of figuring out what to do, if you can’t replicate the results in your execution system)
  3. What-if scenarios including scenario comparison – There is never only one answer to complex problems like supply change. Being able to try out multiple approaches very quickly and compare these approaches means that you can quickly zero in on the best answer.
  4. Collaboration – No one person has the knowledge of the entire supply chain in their head.  You must be able to rely on others to help figure things out.  You must be able to determine who needs to be involved, then share the appropriate scenarios and information with those people if you want to respond quickly (and confidently).
  5. Alerting based on impact, not on the event – There are a lot of things vying for our attention today.  So many, in fact, that we don’t have time to deal with items that aren’t truly important.  Traditional ERP systems drown us in frivolous messages; this supply order is 1 day late, this customer added an order, this job finished on time, etc, etc.  This is not important information –and as a rule can be relegated to summarized reports.  What is critical is: what the impact of these events?  For example, if that order is one day late, it impacts $3 million in customer orders. That’s what you want to know.  If the order is replenishing safety stock – who cares?
  • Inventory planning and optimization – Safety stock traditionally has been a pain to calculate – as a result many people didn’t. They either set the safety stock level once – and forgot about it or did a best guess at what the Safety Stock should be.  Inventory Planning is a relatively new area where safety stock is statistically determined based desired customer service levels and on supply and/or demand history. Traditionally, Safety stock was calculated a single level at a time and didn’t consider the stock of the parent or component item when calculating its own stock level.  Multi-Echelon optimization looks at the inventory for a family of parts and determines where it makes the most sense to locate inventory for individual items within that family and potentially lowers the overall inventory for the family.
  • Inventory accuracy – similar to my carrot analogy –  we all have had situations where you go to the store, buy some goods – then discover that you have 6 cans of the thing you just bought hiding behind the peanut butter.  Or worse, you THINK you have 6 cans of thing you need for supper and you don’t pick more of it up – then you discover that someone (maybe you?) ate it and you actually have none.  In supply chain, the same thing happens – but the cause is inaccurate inventory records and the cost can be huge.  How do inventory records get out of alignment?  In a previous life, I used to work with the operations team and track down inventory records. The biggest culprit was human error; incorrect quantities, incorrect BOMs, spillage, waste, etc.There are two approaches to maintaining accurate records;1. Annual physical inventory – This is a traditional inventory management technique where you take several days, tag all of the items in inventory and have some poor guy count the items, write the count on the tag and turn the tag into a central team that updates the records.  If there is a problem, the poor guy may be asked to go out and count the items again.  There are some problems with this approach;
    • While the inventory is being done, the factory cannot run. This means inventory must be done over the weekend or the factory needs to be shut down.
    • Physical inventories are not fun.  It’s tedious, boring, dirty, nasty work (speaking as someone who’s done it). It’s often performed by people not necessarily tied to the inventory function. It’s difficult to be precise counting thousands of different parts in the course of a few days.  It’s very likely that a significant number of the counts will be wrong.
    • The root cause of the error (why the inventory is wrong) is seldom ever caught and as such, doesn’t get corrected.

    2. Cycle counting – Cycle counting is a system where some small percentage of items get counted every day.  Important parts get counted several times per year, while unimportant parts are counted once per year. Every item is guaranteed to be counted at least once. The advantages of cycle counting are numerous;

    • The supply chain continues to function while the cycle count is done
    • The count is performed by inventory specialists that know the inventory, are used to counting and are incented to get it right.
    • Key parts are counted more frequently and therefore will be more accurate.
    • When a discrepancy is found, the team seeks to understand why the error occurred and ideally determines what changes they need to make to prevent the error from happening again.

    Inventory Management is a large and changing topic.  I’ve hit on what I think are some of the top runners in this post, but I know there are more factors that can cause inventory problems.  What issues have you seen?  Comment back and let us know!

     

Posted in Demand management, General News, Inventory management, Sales and operations planning (S&OP), Supply chain collaboration, Supply chain management


Your supply chain is costing you money – Reason #5 Not having a supply chain risk management process

Published October 1st, 2014 by John Westerveld 7 Comments

supply chain risk management

Over the years, working for and with numerous manufacturing companies, I’ve seen many supply chain practices that cost companies money.  Over the next several weeks, I’ll outline these issues and discuss some ideas around how to avoid these practices. You can find the previous posts here:

Reason #5: Not having a supply chain risk management process

In today’s society, unless you are rich enough that you can afford to replace your possessions, pay for your health care, and cover your liabilities, you have insurance (unless you are poor enough that you can’t afford the premiums).  Insurance is a form of risk mitigation. Insurance protects us against theft, fire, accidents, and health emergencies and if this were to happen, it can provide for our family when we pass.   Yet, a surprising number of companies (while they have traditional insurance) do not have a supply chain risk management “insurance” aka a supply chain risk management process. To put it another way, they have insurance to protect them if someone trips on their property and sues, but don’t have a risk management process to mitigate against their top supplier going out of business.  The insurance covers what could be a million dollar risk, supply chain risk management protects against what could be a MULTI-BILLION dollar risk.

Supply chain risk can be broken out into multiple different types;

  • Geographic:  This includes natural disasters and political unrest. These are the types of issues that impact supply for an entire region.  We saw this type of issue over the past several years with the Japan earthquake / Tsunami in and with the Thailand floods.  Political issues can also have a significant impact on supply. Conflicts, government policy changes, regulatory changes and coups can mean that supply is suddenly turned off or that a market is no longer available.
  • Supplier issues: This includes quality issues, delivery reliability, financial stability, reputation, strikes, and pricing changes.  We talked about many of these issues in the first post of this series – “Offshoring without getting the full picture”. The key point here is that in today’s connected supply chain, your suppliers are an extension of your own business.  If your supplier fails financially, it will impact your business.  If your supplier goes on strike or can’t deliver for some other reason, it will impact your business. If your supplier has had a shaky human rights record, your business’s reputation can get tarnished.  If your supplier decides that you need to pay more or global currency exchange rates drive up the cost of a component (and you have no alternatives ready to go) your margins can be significantly impacted.
  • Customer Demand: Interestingly, this is often ignored when people think about supply chain risk however, it can be one of the biggest factors.  If your demand decreases, you have excess inventory or idle capacity.  If your demand disappears completely you are out of business.  If your demand increases significantly, your supply chain can be overwhelmed and delivery becomes an issue.

IT  security: This is also often ignored when thinking about Supply Chain risk.  If you’ve been watching the news lately, you know that hackers seemingly are able to access corporate records at will.  Imagine now, if hackers accessed your design systems…. Your customer records, your accounts payables / accounts receivables.  Imagine if your proprietary designs and customer records were sold to your competitors.  Not a pleasant idea to think about but something that is happening every day despite the billions of dollars spent on IT security.

In the post “Innovate approaches to Supply Chain Risk”  I describe 4 key action areas that companies developing a more systematic, focused and proactive supply chain risk management approach need to address as outlined in a report by SCM World;

  • Identifying and assessing risk – This includes visibility across the supply chain including a good understanding of the companies involved.  Leaders like Cisco and IBM utilize dialog with suppliers and customers as well as visual risk mapping and scenario planning techniques
  • Quantifying and prioritizing risk – Given that all companies operate on limited resources, focus on those areas that will deliver the biggest benefits. One way is to plot likelihood of occurrence against business impact. While this approach can work well for recurring operational risks like supplier performance, it doesn’t work as well for hard to predict incidents like natural disasters.  One approach suggested in the article is that supply chain managers assign financial impact and time to recover factors at a site and component level.  This tends to identify critical but low-spend suppliers that may otherwise be overlooked.
  • Mitigating Risk – inventory tracking and dual sourcing are considered to be the most effective risk mitigation strategies.  Also increasing use of standard components, segmented and regionalized supply chain strategies and business continuity plans
  • Speeding Recovery – Business continuity plans that have been developed and tested with suppliers are key to rapid recovery

Supply chain risk management is like insurance.  You hope you never need it, but if you do, you will consider it the best investment you ever made.

Do you have a supply chain risk management process in place? What risks worry you and how do you mitigate against them? Comment back and let us know!

 

Posted in Inventory management, Sales and operations planning (S&OP), Supply chain management, Supply chain risk management


Top 10 Movie Quotes from Kinexions! The Kinaxis Training & User Conference

Published September 26th, 2014 by Bill DuBois 0 Comments

Film poster for Top Gun (film) - Copyright 198...It’s an exciting time of the year at Kinaxis as we gear up for another user conference. Kinexions will take place this year in San Diego with the theme set as Innovation at Mach Speed (with some Top Gun references), a keynote from Navy SEAL Robert O’Neill and Afterburner (actual fighter pilots), along with a unique Customer Appreciation event.

The last couple of years we did parodies on movies, like “The Hangover” and “Back to the Future” so with the movie theme continuing, here are the…

Top 10 movie quotes from Kinexions that were also heard in famous movies.

10. Exchange between a customer and developer after seeing the capabilities in the next release: “Surely you can’t be serious?!” “I am serious…and don’t call me Shirley.”

9. Customer sharing ERP deployment horror stories: “ERP deployment is like a tense episode of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’…only it doesn’t last 22 minutes. It lasts a lifetime.”

8. Customer talking to his Account Executive: “Keith, since I’ve met you I’ve noticed things I never knew were there before…birds singing, dew glistening on a newly formed leaf, stoplights….(scorecards, dashboards…).”

7. Customer after hearing Doug Colbeth’s opening remarks: “He’s the sweetest guy. Have you ever looked into his eyes? I swear it was like the first time I heard the Beatles.”

6. Prospect after seeing a Customer presentation: “I’ll have what she’s having.”

5. Customer before the Product Management presentation: “Go ahead, make my day.”

4.  Product Management after their presentation: “How’d ya like those apples?”

3. CIO to VP of Supply Chain: With great power comes great responsibility.”

2. Customer running a “what-if” in a training class: “I feel the need. I feel the need for speed.”

1. Attendee leaving Kinexions: “I’ll Be Back”.

 

Can you guess the movies? Hope to see you at Kinexions.

kinexions 2014

Posted in Demand management, General News, Jokes, Sales and operations planning (S&OP), Supply chain collaboration, Supply chain management


Purposeful Collaboration: What It Could Mean for Your S&OP Process

Published September 22nd, 2014 by Melissa Clow 0 Comments

Purposeful Collaboration What It Could Mean for Your S and OP Process

Just a quick post to let our readers know of an upcoming webcast “Purposeful Collaboration:  What It Could Mean for Your S&OP Process” on Wednesday, October 8th at 2:00pm ET.

Even with heavy investments in Sales and Operations Planning (S&OP), many organizations are not achieving material or sustainable breakthroughs. This is often because they are executing a sequential, disjointed process with contributors operating in their narrow functional box.

In this webcast, learn how purposeful collaboration can connect content, conversations, colleagues and communities to drive improved business outcomes.

Topics covered:

  • Harnessing and capitalizing on “working social” in a B2B environment
  • Using the key tenets of purposeful collaboration to enable effective decision-making, resolution and consensus building
  • Capabilities required to facilitate purposeful collaboration in S&OP
  • Changing the mindset away from the individual supply chain / S&OP functions to connecting functions and most importantly, people

register now

 

 

Speakers:

Alan Lepofsky, VP and Principal Analyst, Constellation Research
With almost two decades of experience in the software industry, Alan helps organizations understand how to develop, purchase and implement collaboration solutions. Rather than evangelizing how social software can change the way people work, he instead focuses on how organizations can improve their existing business processes by providing access to the colleagues, content and communities that can help people get their work done more effectively.

Trevor Miles, VP Thought Leadership, Kinaxis
As vice president of Thought Leadership, Trevor serves as an expert source for Kinaxis customers, prospects, industry analysts and journalists. Known throughout the supply chain field, he has published many articles, presented at various industry events, and is a contributor to the Kinaxis 21st Century Supply Chain blog.

 

Posted in General News, Milesahead, Miscellanea, Sales and operations planning (S&OP), Supply chain management


Your supply chain is costing you money – Reason #3 Not having end-to-end supply chain visibility

Published September 17th, 2014 by John Westerveld 0 Comments

LA freeway is like complex streets of supply chain

Not having end-to-end supply chain visibility

Over the years, working for and with numerous manufacturing companies, I’ve seen many supply chain practices that cost companies money.  Over the next several weeks, I’ll outline these issues and discuss some ideas around how to avoid these practices. You can find the previous posts here:

Imagine this scenario.  You are a supply chain leader. It’s Friday afternoon and your thoughts are turning to the upcoming weekend with your family.  The phone rings – it’s your VP of sales. A prospect that your company has been chasing for years has finally agreed to place an order.  It’s a big one and they need it fast.  Really fast.  Inside cumulative lead-time fast.  The question is can you do it.  Can you commit to this order with confidence that you can deliver?

Traditional ERP offers a couple possible options.  1) Load and pray. Accept the order and hope / pray that everything aligns and you actually can deliver on time… maybe event at a profit. The problem with this approach is that very often, you can’t deliver and you lose a customer and worse your reputation.  2) Fire drill (I knew a company that actually called it that). This is where you e-mail each node in the supply chain with the order requirements, have everyone do a feasibility analysis on accepting the order and then wait for the results. The results, however may take several days / weeks to come in.  By that time the customer and their lucrative order have moved on.

Why are there only these two options with traditional ERP systems? It comes down to the disconnected nature of these systems. Companies that have grown through acquisition typically have multiple ERP systems distributed throughout the enterprise. Even if systems are from the same vendor, they will often be at different versions and are not interconnected.  So a scheduler at one plant has no visibility as to the inventory position, capacity or material supplies at another plant.   The only recourse is to pick up the phone or pound out an email to find out…or guess.

There is a third option, one where you can commit to a customer order with confidence. This new approach enables you to simulate the addition of the new order, see the impact across the entire supply chain, try out different options to resolve any shortages and most importantly know that you can commit to and actually deliver this order…and respond in hours not days or weeks.

This option requires a new tool and a new way of thinking. This approach requires lightning fast simulation and, most importantly, visibility to all the nodes of your supply chain. Let’s look at these one by one;

  • Simulation – To simulate the impact of a major supply chain change like a large order you need to have several things; 1) Analytics that model the results from each of the ERP systems involved in your supply chain.  2) An in-memory data model that bypasses the slow read/write cycles used by disk based systems resulting in lightning fast supply chain calculations and 3) the ability to instantly create scenarios – effectively a copy of the entire database within which you can try out multiple approaches to resolve supply chain issues 4) the ability to share and collaborate with other members of your team.
  • Visibility– Imagine trying to drive a car where you have no visibility to the side, none behind nothing out front except through a little 4” by 5” window.  Yes, you might be able to successfully navigate but the chances of you making a very expensive mistake is pretty high. The sad thing is that this is how many of us navigate the complex streets of supply chain. Traditional ERP often are siloes of information locking off other nodes because they are using different versions or worse, entirely different versions. In our drop in situation, you could have sufficient inventory at a different site but never know it because you can’t see it. But visibility goes beyond the raw data.  Many traditional ERP systems limit visibility because they are designed to show one part, one order at a time.  You cannot look at aggregated data without running specialized reports or extracting the data and loading it into a BI tool.Visibility also means understanding the impact of your decisions on key corporate metrics. Knowing that when you make a decision, that it make sense not only from the context of your department, but also for the company as a whole.

How do achieve supply chain visibility?  Comment back and let us know.

 

Posted in Demand management, General News, Supply chain management


Your supply chain is costing you money – Reason #2 Poorly executed or non-existent sales and operations planning

Published September 10th, 2014 by John Westerveld 4 Comments

sales and operations planning gears

Reason #2: Poorly executed or non-existent sales and operations planning

Over the years, working for and with numerous manufacturing companies, I’ve seen many supply chain practices that cost companies money.  Over the next several weeks, I’ll outline these issues and discuss some ideas around how to avoid these practices. You can find the previous post here:

Tell me if you’ve heard this one before.  Your company has implemented an S&OP process.  At first it showed some promise, but now it has turned into a blamefest attended if at all by lower level representatives that aren’t empowered to make decisions.  No one trusts the numbers, inputs are late and you aren’t seeing any improvements month over month and people are starting to wonder “why bother”.  Sound familiar?

So how does a poor S&OP process cost money?

  • Excess and obsolete inventory. S&OP is all about aligning manufacturing and sales. When you don’t make what you sell and don’t sell what you make you create inventory.  Lots of it.
  • Lost sales.  This is the corollary to the above.  Typically companies with poor planning don’t have too much of everything.  They have too much of things that aren’t needed and too little of things that are.
  • Lost market opportunities.  Companies without an effective S&OP are typically much slower to react to market changes.  This means that their competitors will beat them into new markets and products.

A well-executed sales and operations planning process can transform a company; allowing them to better control inventory and costs while meeting rapidly changing demand pictures.  It does this by gaining alignment across the sales, demand planning, manufacturing and finance organization.  In effect making sure all areas of the company are working towards the same plan and towards the same goal.  5 years ago, I wrote a blog post in which I discussed the 3 pillars of S&OP. They are;

Process:  Trying to run sales and operations planning without a clearly defined process is like driving in a city where no one obeys the rules of the road….you probably won’t get where you are going.   If there were no process driving S&OP, then there is a very good chance that key information would not be presented (or presented poorly), key people would not be in attendance and that critical decisions would not be made.  It is important that the structure, timing and agenda of S&OP is documented, published and adhered to.   If the process needs to change due to changing business requirements, those changes need to be documented and published.

Executive Commitment:  It is very difficult (bordering on impossible) to implement an effective S&OP process without executive commitment.  Why?  First let’s ask what is the purpose of S&OP?  The purpose of S&OP is to align supply and demand and the various departments contributing to that alignment. Departmental alignment can only occur if the top level department executives are involved in the key decisions…because those top executives have the decision making authority.  Sales and Ops is a failure if the representative at the meeting needs to go back to their executive to get a decision.

Effective S&OP Tools: This includes the tools to analyze the data, present information and make decisions.  Effective S&OP tools also include the ability to integrate the data that drives S&OP.  While Excel can be fine to do the initial S&OP model, moving to the next level of S&OP effectiveness requires a more integrated, responsive and collaborative application.

S&OP is a powerful tool if performed well. Inventory reductions, improved efficiency, improved customer service and reduced expedites are all expected benefits.  However, If there is no buy in, if executive commitment isn’t there, if data isn’t reliable and doesn’t drive action your S&OP process won’t delivery these results.

Have you experienced poor S&OP planning processes?  How about excellent planning?  Comment back and share!

Posted in Sales and operations planning (S&OP), Supply chain collaboration, Supply chain management


On the road! 4 September supply chain conferences we love

Published September 9th, 2014 by Melissa Clow 0 Comments

September is a busy time of year for us at Kinaxis – Many folks here are flying the skies to attend various conferences. Here’s the supply chain conferences we love and will be attending. Hope to see you in the coming weeks!

Gartner EMEA1. Gartner Supply Chain Executive Conference
September 10-11
London, UK

Kinaxis is pleased to be a Premier Sponsor and participate in panel discussion of the 2014 EMEA Gartner Supply Chain Executive Conference.

Panel Details:
“The Technological Advances that Will Catapult Supply Chains into the Next Decade”
Wednesday September 10th at 9:45 AM – 10:15 AM in Room Westminster B&C

Immediately following the keynote speaker, Trevor Miles, Vice President of Thought Leadership at Kinaxis, along with other technology vendors, will take part in the following panel topic: Technology advancements have been at the heart of supply chain transformations during the past decade. Throughout the next decade, a whole new set of technologies will underpin supply chain success stories. A series of thought-provoking questions focused on the future of supply chain technologies will be put to the panel.

Learn More
Schedule Meeting
 
Supply Chain Insights Conference Image
2. Supply Chain Insights Global Summit
September 10-11
Scottsdale, AZ

Kinaxis is pleased to sponsor and participate in panel discussion the Supply Chain Insights Global Summit.

This exclusive event is designed for the line-of-business leader (Supply Chain Leaders, Chief Financial Officers and Corporate Social Responsibility Leaders) driving supply chain excellence and building value networks.

Panel Details:
“Top 15 Supply Chains to Admire”
Wednesday, September 10th at 10:30 AM – 11:15 AM in Room Westminster B&C
The Phoenician, Scottsdale, AZ

The “Top 15 Supply Chains to Admire” is the culmination of a two-year effort to evaluate supply chain performance and improvement for the years of 2006-2013 by industry by vertical for publicly-held companies. To make the list, companies out-performed their peer group on operating margin, inventory turns and Return on Invested Capital while driving significant improvement in financial metrics over the period.Supply Chain Improvement is based on a detailed analysis calculated factors for balance, strength and resiliency. This methodology, termed the Supply Chain Index, was developed in partnership with the Operations Research team at Arizona State University. As part of the panel, four ex-AMR analysts –Roddy Martin, Mickey North Rizza, Lora Cecere and CJ Wehlage– will share insights on the results and the trends.

Learn More
Schedule Meeting
 
LogiPharma US
3. LogiPharma
September 16-18
Princeton, NJ

Kinaxis is pleased to be a sponsor and participate in panel discussion of North America’s #1 End to End Supply Chain Conference for Pharmaceutical and BioPharmaceutical Companies.

Supply Chain Visibility Panel Details:
“Getting Information from a Variety of Systems into One Location to Extract Information”
Thursday September 18th at 9:55 AM

Join Trevor Miles, Vice President, Thought Leadership at Kinaxis, along with supply chain executives, as they discuss ways to gather data from a variety of systems into one location for the purposes of gaining actionable information and insight to make decisions in real time.

Learn More
Schedule Meeting
Automotive Logistics Global Conference
4. Automotive Logistics Global Conference
September 16-18
Detroit, Michigan

Kinaxis is pleased to be a Silver Sponsor of the 15th Annual Automotive Logistics Global Conference.

The Automotive Logistics Global Conference is the place where the intelligence, contacts and expertise come together to address industry challenges.  Join Kinaxis and the most senior executives from OEMs, Tier suppliers and LSPs to network, learn and do business.

Learn More
Schedule Meeting
 
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Happy Tuesday all!

Posted in General News, Sales and operations planning (S&OP), Supply Chain Events, Supply chain management