Video: Schneider Electric Charts an End-to-End Supply Chain Roadmap

MelissaClow

Does your organization have a massive worldwide supply chain network? A diverse IT landscape? These were some of the challenges Schneider Electric was facing. Their network is made of about 250 factories, about 100 distribution centers, various IT systems and a significant number of products.

The company decided they wanted to build an extended visibility network to be able to better address customers, deliver products on time, and move from reactive supply chain to a proactive one.

Watch now: Schneider Electric Charts an End-to-End Supply Chain Roadmap

Schneider Electric Charts an End-to-End Supply Chain Roadmap

Read the full story

Design for the Supply Chain Pt 7: Honest

JonathanLofton

We’re getting into the second half of the “10 Principles of Good Design” as applied to supply chain and supply chain management (Design for the Supply Chain). This week we’re talking about the honesty of the supply chain management solution.

Principle #6: Good design “Is honest”

“It does not make a product appear more innovative, powerful or valuable than it really is. It does not attempt to manipulate the consumer with promises that cannot be kept.” – ‘Dieter Rams: ten principles for good design’

This principle immediately brings to mind for me the Gartner hype cycle. As an example, below is the Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2015.

Design for the Supply Chain is Honest

Source: Gartner

I like to think about the hype cycle as being similar to Tuckman’s model of group development: Forming–Storming–Norming–Performing where:

  • Innovation Trigger and Peak of Inflated Expectations ≈ Forming
  • Trough of Disillusionment ≈ Storming
  • Slope of Enlightenment ≈ Norming
  • Plateau of Productivity ≈ Performing

Read the full story

Before Adopting a Supply Chain Planning System of Record, Consider This

MelissaClow
  • by Melissa Clow
  • Published

Supply Chain Planning System of Record

Supply chain functions have often been segmented into siloed activities specific to functional goals and that reflect organizational structure. Over the years, software has been designed, developed and deployed in the same isolated manner. In contrast to this approach, a supply chain planning (SCP) system of record (SOR) enables a company to ‘create, manage, link, align, collaborate and share its planning data across a supply chain’.1

More and more supply chain teams are recognizing the value this type of planning platform can bring to supporting their end-to-end supply chain networks. However, there are some key considerations to keep in mind when evaluating these solutions, such as:

  • Does it solve the fundamental challenges you face?
  • Is it providing something different from what you have?
  • What are your peers leveraging?
  • Is it uniquely and purposely designed for end-to-end supply chain management?
  • What ROI does it deliver?

Read the full story

Video: Trinity Rail – Building a Sense-and-Respond Supply Chain

MelissaClow
  • by Melissa Clow
  • Published

How do you face uncertainty in your supply chain?

According to Mike Hegedus, vice president of supply chain management at Trinity Rail, one of the most difficult things a supply chain manager faces is uncertainty in the supply chain. In their business, there are so many different possibilities of train cars that can be built. And among those different car types, they’re customized in many ways for each customer – making it nearly impossible to forecast what the customer’s going to require.

Realizing that “the forecast is always wrong,” Trinity Rail opts instead to focus on creating a “sense-and-respond” supply chain, to deal with real-world developments in demand for transportation equipment.

In this video, Mike Hegedus explains how their ability to quickly satisfy those customer demands has improved since moving to a sense-and-respond operating model: “we get our executives from sales, operations, finance, and supply chain together on a weekly basis. And we review the demand situation to make decisions; very important decisions about how to handle these orders.” Having supply planning technology in place to have a flexible supply chain is an important component to make it possible to deliver on their business strategy.

Watch now: Trinity Rail – Building a Sense-and-Respond Supply Chain

Trinity Rail: Building a Sense-and-Respond Supply Chain

Read the full story

Supply Chain Lessons from Prince and Other Fallen Musical Heroes

BillDuBois
  • by Bill DuBois
  • Published

Musical Hero

The past year has not been kind to our musical idols. Although many have passed, including David Bowie, BB King, Glen Frey and most recently Prince, we’ll always have a phenomenal body of musical works to keep them alive in our hearts and minds. When you hear these names and their music you don’t immediately think supply chain, but for all the supply chain nerds out there we’re always thinking, ‘what’s the impact on the supply chain?’ Aside from family, now that my hockey team is out of the NHL playoffs, supply chain and music are what’s running through my brain.

As a guitar player myself, I was in total awe of Prince’s prowess on the fretboard. Check out the YouTube video of Prince soloing on While My Guitar Gently Weeps during George Harrison’s induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The smile on Harrison’s son at 4:46 of the video says it all when it comes to Prince. While watching the video I was thinking two things. He is the ultimate axe slinger / showman, and there will be a huge demand spike for everything purple. Thinking about the musical geniuses mentioned above there are few other helpful lessons we can take away in their memory.

Challenge the Status Quo

I’m huge Eagles fan. I couldn’t believe someone could tear up the guitar as well as Prince. So I paid close attention to the careers of both Glen Frey and Prince. From the time a song idea popped into their heads, until that song ended up as soundwaves directed at fans’ ears, they both were meticulous about the entire process. That includes the song writing, recording, and distribution of their works. Glen Frey for the most part fired Glyn Johns, the same guy who produced The Who, Led Zeppelin, and the Rolling Stones, because he wasn’t satisfied with the recording process. Glen and Prince also challenged the way music was distributed. For example, the Eagles completely bypassed the record companies to distribute their album The Long Road Out Of Eden. Instead they inked a deal to distribute directly with Walmart. If Prince had been a supply chain leader (just imagine that) he would likely be asking the same questions he asked during his musical career, ‘Why are we doing things this way?’ or ‘this isn’t good enough, what else can we do?’ We should ask the same questions about our supply chain processes and technologies all with the goal of achieving excellence.

Read the full story

6 Prophetic Supply Chain Quotable Quotes

BillDuBois
  • by Bill DuBois
  • Published

Prophetic Supply Chain Quotes

When I was growing up my parents always had a Reader’s Digest on the coffee table. When a new one came into the house I immediately went to either the ‘Points to Ponder’ or the ‘Quotable Quotes’. I guess they were your grandparent’s Twitter. In both cases there were great lessons in a couple sentences, most which would meet Twitter’s criteria of 140 characters. Although I don’t pick up Reader’s Digest as much, I still love a great quote. Here are six interesting supply chain quotes that provide some lessons along with a prophetic vision of the supply chain future.

1. “You need to start your supply chain conversation.” S&OP Demand Planning Manager, Sonus

Sales talk to Operations and Product Line Managers? What happened to just throwing it over the fence and letting things happen? In most cases the customer got what they wanted, close to when they wanted it. This quote is powerful because it implies getting ahead of potential problems and immediately driving to a solution that likely includes compromise, trade-offs, and dialog. Reacting and seeing impact after the fact won’t cut it anymore; start your supply chain conversation.

2. “If you had to wait a week for Google to respond, would you use it?” Dominic Thomas, VP Business Consulting, Kinaxis and Supply & Demand Chain Executive magazine 2016 Provider ‘Pro to Know’

I was fortunate enough to hear Dominic present and when this line came out I committed it to memory. My immediate thought was the supply chain planning community is either extremely patient or has surrendered to Excel and legacy planning systems. This gets back to starting your supply chain conversation. Today asking a supply chain question like, ‘what’s the impact of a 20% demand increase?’ could mean another meeting while those who have to answer try and piece the response together. I didn’t include it as one of the quotes but I once heard a supply chain executive say, “It takes me three weeks to get the wrong answer.” Future supply chain planning processes should no longer include ‘waiting’ as one of the squares on the Visio flowchart.

Read the full story

The rise of contingent workers is shaking up the 21st-century economy

MelissaClow
  • by Melissa Clow
  • Published

This guest post comes to us from Argentus Supply Chain Recruiting, a boutique recruitment firm specializing in Supply Chain Management.

Contingent Workers of the 21st Century EconomyThis week, we want to highlight a fascinating survey by global management consultancy Deloitte. Titled Human Capital Trends 2016, the survey solicited 7000 responses from executives at 130 countries about a vast array of workforce topics including organizational design, hiring, leadership, and other issues, with the goal of assessing how the 21st-century workplace is evolving.

Most relevant to our work at Argentus, Deloitte’s survey features a section on the way that the rise of contingent workers is shaking up the 21st-century economy, with lots of great takeaways for companies looking to make their organizations nimbler, more responsive, and cost effective.

The big headline, for us, is that 42% of executives surveyed plan to increase or significantly increase the use of contingent workers over the next three to five years. Conversely, only 16% of executives expect to decrease the size of their contingent workforce. According to the survey, 62% of Canadian executives surveyed rated the trend towards a more flexible workforce as “important” or “very important,” with that number going even higher in some rapid-growth markets such as India and Brazil.

Deloitte’s survey factored in a variety of contingent workers, including contractors, freelancers, and part-time employees. According to the survey, one in three workers in the U.S. is part of the contingent workforce, with that number expected to grow to half in the coming years.

Read the full story

Video: Amgen Transforms Its Supply Chain Planning

MelissaClow
  • by Melissa Clow
  • Published

Looking to transform your supply chain? Need some inspiration? In this video, Paul Collier, supply chain senior manager of Amgen, talks about the major initiatives that the company has undertaken to improve supply-chain planning, collaboration and regulatory compliance.

Amgen knew that the business was going to be coming into some major transformative change, in terms of international expansion and product candidates that were coming through for approvals. To make this transformation, they needed supply chain planning technology that would be able to respond to that transformative change in a fast, effectively and a quality manner.

Watch now: Amgen Transforms Its Supply-Chain Planning

Amgen Transforms Its Supply Chain Planning

Read the full story