Search results for 'cabbage patch'

The perfect gift this holiday season? How about The Ultimate S&OP toolkit?

The ultimate S&OP toolkitThe biggest toy sellers (Target, Walmart, JCPenney and Amazon) have announced their picks for the hottest toys of the year. Coming in at number 1 are Pomsies – animatronic, interactive pets that kids can take anywhere. Let’s hope supply chains are doing their thing by producing enough of these cuddly critters to meet demand so the world doesn’t have to deal with another Cabbage Patch Kid-like debacle.

So now that the kids are taken care of, what’s on your wish list? If you’re looking for that something special, why not consider the ultimate S&OP toolkit?

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How the Supply Chain Planning System Stole Christmas

cabbage patch kidThe year is 1983, and all my sister and I wanted from Santa was a Cabbage Patch Kid doll. We had been dying for one for months, and my sister and I even dressed as Cabbage Patch Kids for Halloween that year (see picture proof included). If you were a little girl (and some boys I’m sure too, fess up boys!) around this time, you likely asked for the same thing from Jolly old St. Nick that year. If you were not part of this craze, let me tell you it was not a logical fad during the home computer and video game revolution of the 80’s. Cabbage Patch Kids were homely fabric dolls with yarn for hair, and each one was unique and came with a name. During a time when toys were continuing to get flashier and included electronics, these basic dolls were the hottest toy going that Christmas.

Cabbage Patch KidsThese dolls were manufactured in Asia and typically shipped by boat. While this was a cost effective shipping method, the entire supply chain planning system wasn’t fast and took four to six weeks for the dolls to arrive on the West Coast. In the weeks leading up to Christmas of 1983, the Cabbage Patch Kids craze was at its height. It gave rise to something that we are all too familiar with now – the shopping frenzy and in-store brawls over a toy. Display tables were knocked over, fights broke out. All of this chaos was caused by the shortage of the dolls. Once the company saw that they were not going to have enough supply to cover demand, they tried to fly the dolls rather than ship by boat, but their long lead times prevented them from manufacturing enough of the dolls to cover this unforeseen demand.

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