Posts categorized as 'Consumer products'

Cross-border geoblocking and the supply chain’s last mile

DustinMattison

Cross-border geoblocking and the supply chain's last mile

I recently spoke with Robert Thiemann, the Founder of BPM-Lux and Advisor of BPM, Logistics & Transport to discuss recent changes in cross-border geoblocking regulations in Europe and the implications for consumers and sellers.

As a result of these changes, Thiemann details why online retailers will need to consider how to design last mile supply chain solutions to facilitate cross border deliveries and the return of unwanted goods for end consumers.

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How vehicle customization will drive the supply chain of the future

DustinMattison

How vehicle customization will drive the supply chain of the futureI recently had the opportunity to sit down with Farhan Mirza, President of BAFF Consultants Inc., to discuss vehicle customization by original equipment manufacturer (OEM) automakers and its impact on the supply chain of the future.

Mirza notes that customization is a significant market trend and believes the entire supply chain will require transformation as the customization of vehicles becomes a mainstream approach to production.

In the interview, Mirza introduces some of the supply chain challenges which will need to be addressed to reap the profit potential.

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There will be no Valentine’s Day Sweethearts this year

AlisonCrawford

There will be no Valentine's Day Sweethearts this yearValentine’s Day will be less romantic this year. Due to financial troubles, corporate acquisitions, time constraints, and a lack of supply chain planning we won’t be able to tell the ones we love things like “Be Mine”, “Kiss Me”, “Call Me”, “Let’s Get Busy”, or “Miss You” in sweet, chalky letters.

That’s because, for the first time since their creation in 1901, Sweethearts candies, an iconic staple of our Valentine’s Day celebrations won’t be manufactured.

Consumer packaged goods is a tough and evolving market

Faltering consumer packaged goods (CPG) companies are a very common phenomenon in this new consumer world, so it’s no surprise that Necco shuttered its doors. There were company specific issues with cleanliness in their factory, and larger trends of slowing sales of sugary foods as well as distribution limitations. Like many other consumer product companies, Necco was heavily reliant on retailers to sell all items in their portfolio. Necco didn’t evolve, and for that reason, they went the way of Clearly Canadian and Dunkaroos.

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