Posts categorized as 'Supply chain collaboration'

Top 10 Movie Quotes from Kinexions! The Kinaxis Training & User Conference

BillDuBois

Film poster for Top Gun (film) - Copyright 198...It’s an exciting time of the year at Kinaxis as we gear up for another user conference. Kinexions will take place this year in San Diego with the theme set as Innovation at Mach Speed (with some Top Gun references), a keynote from Navy SEAL Robert O’Neill and Afterburner (actual fighter pilots), along with a unique Customer Appreciation event.

The last couple of years we did parodies on movies, like “The Hangover” and “Back to the Future” so with the movie theme continuing, here are the…

Top 10 movie quotes from Kinexions that were also heard in famous movies.

10. Exchange between a customer and developer after seeing the capabilities in the next release: “Surely you can’t be serious?!” “I am serious…and don’t call me Shirley.”

9. Customer sharing ERP deployment horror stories: “ERP deployment is like a tense episode of ‘Everybody Loves Raymond’…only it doesn’t last 22 minutes. It lasts a lifetime.”

8. Customer talking to his Account Executive: “Keith, since I’ve met you I’ve noticed things I never knew were there before…birds singing, dew glistening on a newly formed leaf, stoplights….(scorecards, dashboards…).”

7. Customer after hearing Doug Colbeth’s opening remarks: “He’s the sweetest guy. Have you ever looked into his eyes? I swear it was like the first time I heard the Beatles.”

6. Prospect after seeing a Customer presentation: “I’ll have what she’s having.”

5. Customer before the Product Management presentation: “Go ahead, make my day.”

4. Product Management after their presentation: “How’d ya like those apples?”

3. CIO to VP of Supply Chain: With great power comes great responsibility.”

2. Customer running a “what-if” in a training class: “I feel the need. I feel the need for speed.”

1. Attendee leaving Kinexions: “I’ll Be Back”.

 

Can you guess the movies? Hope to see you at Kinexions.

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Your supply chain is costing you money – Reason #4 Making key decisions by modelling the supply chain in Excel

JohnWesterveld

Reason #4 Making key decisions by modelling the supply chain in Excel

Making key decisions by modelling the supply chain in Excel

Over the years, working for and with numerous manufacturing companies, I’ve seen many supply chain practices that cost companies money. Over the next several weeks, I’ll outline these issues and discuss some ideas around how to avoid these practices. You can find the previous posts here:

In my career, I’ve had the pleasure of working with several top tier supply chain companies. Companies that are household names. Companies that have been in business for decades. Companies worth billions of dollars. Companies that are forced to use Excel to manage large swaths of their advanced supply chain planning. Companies that are starting to realize that while Excel is a powerful tool and can be used for lots of things, it isn’t the tool to use to run your supply chain.

Excel excels (if you’ll pardon the pun) at many things. But modelling complex supply chain relationships isn’t one of them. There are many issues with using excel that have been written about numerous times in this blog. A sampling are here, and here.

I can briefly summarize the main points;

Companies use Excel because their traditional planning systems don’t allow them to view and understand aggregate data and more importantly, don’t allow them to effectively react quickly to change. However, because people need this information and because people (especially those in supply chain) are very smart and come up with ingenious ways to solve problems, they extract data from their ERP systems and build complex models in Excel.

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Your supply chain is costing you money – Reason #2 Poorly executed or non-existent sales and operations planning

JohnWesterveld

sales and operations planning gears

Reason #2: Poorly executed or non-existent sales and operations planning

Over the years, working for and with numerous manufacturing companies, I’ve seen many supply chain practices that cost companies money. Over the next several weeks, I’ll outline these issues and discuss some ideas around how to avoid these practices. You can find the previous post here:

Tell me if you’ve heard this one before. Your company has implemented an S&OP process. At first it showed some promise, but now it has turned into a blamefest attended if at all by lower level representatives that aren’t empowered to make decisions. No one trusts the numbers, inputs are late and you aren’t seeing any improvements month over month and people are starting to wonder “why bother”. Sound familiar?

So how does a poor S&OP process cost money?

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Throw Back Thursday: How Can Companies Respond Rapidly to Demand?

MelissaClow

How Can Companies Respond Rapidly to Demand? Kinexions - Kinaxis & SupplyChainBrain Series

As I’ve mentioned in my last couple of Thursday blogs, we are starting to gear up for this year’s Kinexions (our annual training & user conference). A few weeks ago I began to reminisce about our videos from past conferences and I decided to create a blog series to share. So, on this ‘Throw Back Thursday’, I would like to share this video of Trevor Miles, Vice President of Thought Leadership, speaking about “How Can Companies Respond Rapidly to Demand?”.

In this video, hear Trevor detail industry’s major supply-chain management challenges – in particular, the difficulty of obtaining full visibility of supply and demand, and dealing with the volatility of markets.

Many companies seem wedded to their spreadsheets, even though they’re aware of the format’s shortcomings. Miles says executives have “a very legacy approach” to thinking about business processes. As a result, they’ve created “islands” of automation that do not add up to a coherent, smoothly flowing supply chain.

“People want to get away from that,” he says, “but it’s the manner in which they are trying to enable those different processes that is just lacking.”

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Elephant in the Room: Thoughts on Metrics That Matter in Semiconductor and Hard Disk Drives

CJWehlage

Metrics That Matter in Semiconductor and Hard Disk Drives

Supply Chain Insights recently published a Metrics That Matter report covering both the Semiconductor and Hard Disk Drive (HDD) industries. Despite being hit hard by the recent recession, overall the research shows that these two industries have fared well over the last decade and are positioned to continue that success.

Success, provided they monitor the 7 “elephants” in the room.

Consolidation

Notice in the Supply Chain Insights report, there are only two HDD companies. That industry has already gone through consolidations. Semiconductor is poised to consolidate, which will have huge impact on the metrics. It’s already happening with Avago/LSI, RF Micro/TriQuint, Micron/Elpida, MediaTek/MStar and Fujitsu/Panasonic. Speed to integrate the planning functions during an acquisition is critical.

Profitability

With the OEM’s driving down the price, the semiconductor/HDD companies will have to follow (or innovate new products). Lower price means lower profitability. This will begin to impact the semi/HDD ability to raise capital and innovate/expand. Cost pressures and faster time to market in the planning processes will be required.

Global pressure

Consider that the Chinese and India governments are investing in the semiconductor industry. With China already a source for semiconductor raw materials and the China/India end consumer market growing, there will be pressure to supply chips and hard drives to local China/India OEM’s first. This could create a shortage in the US/Europe OEM chain. Understanding inventory planning will take on a new dynamic.

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An Open Confession – Please Don’t Fire Me, I Promise to Learn Laugh Share and Connect on the Supply Chain Expert Community

BillDuBois

Before I start let me confess something. I am not a social media guy. I only go on Facebook to see my latest invitations to play Candy Crush and I still think a Twitter is 3 hits away from a no-hitter. However the idea of an online community seemed a bit more appealing since it was all about a group of people with a common interest sharing information on that topic. Obviously one community I pay attention to is the Supply Chain Expert community powered by Kinaxis. That leads me to the second part of my confession. I haven’t been on the community for a little while. Recently I was doing a demonstration of the Dashboard capabilities in RapidResponse. One participant asked about authoring Dashboards and I suggested they visit the Supply Chain Expert Community to check out a short video on authoring dashboards. The third part of my confession is that I had not seen the video for myself. I knew it was there but after making the recommendation I thought I should see it firsthand. The final part of my confession is that I had been taking the content of the community for granted.

The first thing I took for granted is that anyone can get to the dozens of training videos, for free, without having to be a Kinaxis customer. The video I suggested on authoring Dashboards was only one of many. If you look at the 6 menu items below, 5 are open to anyone. Only the support is closed to customers because it deals with specific customer data and use cases.

supply chain expert community header

If you look at the Content section you’ll see everything from ways to better utilize RapidRepsonse to information of key Supply Chain topics and strategies. Sorry, it’s lacking a bit on motivational quotes and links to the latest celebrity wardrobe malfunctions. Notice I’m only in as a guest and still have access to everything from blog posts, discussions and videos.

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David and Goliath: Lessons for supply chains

CarolMcIntosh

David and Goliath | supply chain perspectiveI just finished a great book called ‘David and Goliath’ by Malcolm Gladwell.

The book references the story about two men, Goliath from the Philistines and David from the Israelites in the days of the Old Testament in ancient Palestine.

As most of you know, in the battle of David and Goliath, David, a small man, the underdog, was confronted by a giant, a man so formidable it would have seemed impossible for David to even survive such a fight. But he did. He won using skill and techniques that were not typical for this fight. Goliath was weighed down by his armor. David was flexible, responsive and targeted. He knew that he couldn’t rely on his size if he wanted to win.

Having been in supply chain for so many years, I immediately made a connection.

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What the Analysts Are Saying About…A&D Supply Chains

BillDuBois

What the Supply Chain Analysts Are Saying About A and D Are you looking for some reading material to pass the time on your next flight? Even if you’re not you should check out Supply Chain Insights, Supply Chain Metrics That Matter. For the past several years, Supply Chain Insights has been delivering this research series. What caught my eye is that for each report, they do a deep dive on a specific industry and use a mix of financial data, survey research results and interactions with their clients to help get a better understanding of various industries’ supply chains.

I spread my Supply Chain wings at an Aerospace company and since Aerospace and Defense is a key vertical market for Kinaxis, the recent Supply Chain Metrics That Matter: A Focus on Aerospace & Defense report was downloaded on my laptop to read on my next flight. The research benchmarks A&D companies against other industries and looks at the top five A&D companies over the last decade. Although it didn’t give any suggestions on what to do when you find yourself in row 32, you know the one next to the washroom, it did discuss the challenges the industry is facing as well as offering up solid recommendations for areas of improvement.

From a challenges perspective, here are the highlights covered in this report.

The obvious challenge is the complexity in the A&D industry. The report uses the Boeing 747-8 International as an example. It has about 6 million components which are manufactured in 30 countries by 550 unique suppliers. Think about those design, sourcing and delivery challenges.

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