Posts categorized as 'Supply Chain Events'

The Late Late Supply Chain Show: Top 10 Kinexions Supply Chain Conference ’16 Highlights

BillDuBois

Well, we’re back from another successful Kinexions. Everyone at Kinaxis is still catching their breath and singing Eagles tunes.

There were so many highlights this year’s supply chain conference, it was difficult to get this into a top 10 list, but we did it.

Can you believe my one and only supply chain joke didn’t make the list? You know the one, “What do you get when you play a country song about supply chain backwards? You get your revenue back, your margins back, your customers back…”

Anyway, from the Late Late Supply Chain Show, here are our Top 10 Kinexions ’16 highlights.

kevin-omarah10. Kevin O’Marah. As our day 1 keynote, Kevin did a great job kicking off the conference with his talk on the future of supply chain.

Often, we’re so caught up on our day-to-day activities we don’t think about the mega trends that can affect supply chain. As one person summed it up, “It’s so important to think about what is coming 5/10/20+ years from now. I don’t get that chance too often.”

9. Mainstage Presentations. I may be cheating on this one, but it was too hard to pick just one. Presentations from Ford, Keysight, Roland and Xilinx were all described as “informative and insightful.”

Product roadmap conversations are always popular, and the encore of “The Top 5 Things You Didn’t Know You Could Do with RapidResponse” was a real showstopper. There was also the Maintaining Momentum panel that showcased another four customers.

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Kinexions Day 2: Supply Chain Data, and Processes, and People, Oh My!

MelissaClow

Kinexions Supply Chain“The future is about this connected enterprise with people working together.”

– Trevor Miles, VP of Thought Leadership at Kinaxis

The first day of Kinexions 2016 introduced the revolution of the supply chain. There’s no stopping the speed at which supply chains are running today, which means businesses have to integrate technology, processes, and people in order to successfully manage their supply chain and mitigate risks that arise.

So how do we actually implement integrated supply chain solutions?

That’s where Day 2 of Kinexions came in, with sessions and discussions focused on how businesses today are actually leveraging technology and transforming their internal infrastructures for more efficient end-to-end supply chain planning. Based on learnings from the second and final day of Kinexions, here’s how to actually implement digitization and take your supply chain to the next level.

Leverage IoT and AI in Business Strategy

In his session, Zoltan Pekar explained that while Roland DG Corporation had been at the forefront of digital technology and computing, there was now a need to integrate thanks to the rise of IoT and AI – the “4th Industrial Revolution”. In order to do this, Roland DG needed both the right technology and processes in place. With RapidResponse, Pekar and his team were able to set the foundation of their integrated strategy, becoming more data-driven, agile, and responsive. They then created a new corporate culture and management system, embracing digitization, collaboration, and customer centricity. By integrating new technology and strategy, Roland DG has been able to break down siloes and connect its entire value chain.

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Let’s Start a Revolution: Kinexions Supply Chain Conference Day 1

MelissaClow

kinexions supply chain conferenceHow do you start a supply chain revolution in Nashville? With some toe-tapping music from the Late Late Supply Chain Show band and rockin’ guitar playing from Kinaxis Director of Marketing Content, Bill DuBois, of course!

After an electric and entertaining opener, it was time to get down to business. From opening remarks from John Sicard, president and CEO of Kinaxis, to presentations from SCM World, Ford, and Keysight Technologies, the core theme was this revolutionizing of the supply chain where integration of technology and human involvement are paramount. Let’s take a deeper dive into Day 1 of the Kinexions supply chain conference:

Supply Chain Planning Components are Better Together than Apart

“Humans have to be involved, they have to be empowered.”

In supply chain planning, there are a lot of individual processes – capacity planning, demand planning, inventory management, etc. As Sicard put it, each individual process in supply chain planning is like a link in a chain. Each link serves a purpose and is necessary for making the supply chain function. However, supply chains have focused on these “links” one at a time and in siloes, rather than integrating them. According to Sicard, all parts of the supply chain must be interconnected, with human involvement and empowerment at the forefront. As the supply chain continues to speed up and evolve, anyone should be able to simulate anything they want at any time for faster and more strategic decision making and maintenance of the supply chain.

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The Good, the Bad and the Ugly at the High Tech Supply & Demand Summit

CJWehlage

a vehicle break-in was part of the ugly at the High Tech Supply & Demand SummitThe first words foretold the upcoming days. When I checked into the hotel at the High Tech Supply & Demand Summit in San Francisco, the front desk person, as she was handing me the room card, pointed to the right, and said, “if you go for a walk, don’t go that way, that’s the Tenderloin district. It’s a very dangerous place.”

Those initial words rang true to what happened the next two days. Having spent two years at AMR Research, I’ve seen the type of analyst that will be so direct, the message comes across harsh. I’ve leaned towards the concept of writing the positives, with some humor, and based on practical, business-based supply chain knowledge. Today, for this blog post, that changes.

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A perfect supply chain?

MattBenson

Dabbawala supply chainIf your 3PL supply chain problem was to deliver 400,000 items daily from supplier to customer and your on-time in full metric was a six-sigma target standard of 1 failure per million, how would you do it?

What If I was to also constrain the resources you had at your disposal and said you only had 5000 transportation vehicles and your delivery slot was just 1 hour and that your delivery window was always 12pm until 1pm? What if I was then to say that you had no technology at your disposal to manage it and your only transportation methods were bicycles, trains and feet and you had to do it on a budget of 33 cents per delivery?

Well, that’s what the Dabbawalas in India have been doing in Mumbai for over 100 years – delivering meals direct to workers and school desks from the family home with an OTIF of 99.99 %. They don’t use technology but what they do have is a tried and trusted set of highly efficient robust procedures that govern how they manage their work. It’s a methodology that has been established and passed down from generation to generation and has stood the test of time.

So, why don’t organisations with similar problems just invest time in improving their working procedures? Why do we even need technology? Well, the answer in reality is that we really do need both – not all of our problems are only 3PL issues with supply chains having such stable demand signals – same item, same quantity, to the same customer, pretty much every day. Not all of our supply chains have a zero inventory, stable sub-contracted supply – it’s a relatively quick production process to make an Indian meal (2-3 hours), freshly cooked every day often using Tandoor ovens. In addition, the majority of our distribution networks are geographically wider and much more complex.

Away from Mumbai we’re at the PIMS conference this week in London discussing Pharmaceutical supply chain problems with some key players in the market. The common themes we are hearing are:

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A Brief Report on the Pharmaceutical Innovation in Manufacturing Summit

HansVelthuizen

This week I attended the 5th Annual Pharmaceutical Innovation in Manufacturing Summit near Heathrow. Although the conference was situated in the Edwardian style Radisson hotel neatly decorated with Persian rugs, brass-railed staircases and chandeliers, the location stood in sharp contrast with the innovative character of the Summit.

The objective of the summit was to provide an open forum for highly insightful presentations that span a broad range of topics critical to the biologics field. It was a two-day gathering dedicated to cutting edge technology, innovation and strategy across the entire small molecule & biopharmaceutical manufacturing process.

As good as the sessions were, I always find the networking opportunities the most useful at these kinds of summits. There was plenty of room during dinners and lunch breaks to discuss new ideas with industry peers. Seeing a lot of familiar faces you realize that the pharmaceutical supply chain is a small world.

Distinctive of this summit was the wide variety of topics and themes that passed these two days. Topics that were discussed ranged from strategic supply chain challenges to operational packaging and labeling processes and techniques. While there are undoubtedly some topics relevant for each participant, it seemed very well possible this broad setup of event missed its goal.

Kinaxis was present with a booth and Laura Dionne, Senior Director, Worldwide Operations Planning at TriQuint gave a well-received presentation titled ‘A Healthy Dose of Chips: Supply Chain Lessons for Life Sciences’. In this presentation Laura discussed the similarities between pharmaceutical and Semiconductor supply chains and also the solutions that can be applied for addressing similar challenges.

triquint supply chain journey

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A Healthy Dose of Chips: Supply Chain Lessons for Life Sciences at the 2015 Pharmaceutical Innovation in Manufacturing Summit

MelissaClow

A quick post to let our readers know that we’ll be at the 2015 Pharmaceutical Innovation in Manufacturing Summit (PIMS). This year’s event will be held at the Radisson Blu Edwardian Hotel, London, February 10-11, 2015.

If you plan to attend the conference, join Laura Dionne, Senior Director, Worldwide Operations Planning, TriQuint as she presents Laura DionneA Healthy Dose of Chips: Supply Chain Lessons for Life Sciences from a High Tech Veteran’ on Tuesday, February 10th at 2:15pm.

Session Details

What can a lifelong Semiconductor Supply Chain expert have to say about Pharmaceuticals? A surprising amount it seems! In this presentation we will explore the similarities between these supply chains and also the solutions that can be applied for addressing these challenges.

Laura Dionne, a 33 year Semiconductor Veteran and supply chain change agent will discuss the commonalities including the challenge of planning a wealth of products that can be manufactured from a singular base material, how quality creates an underlying tension that drives customer fulfillment and margins, and also how inventory strategy can make the difference between profit and loss. Cross over of experts between industries is not anything new to the supply chain, but few would recognize what can be learned about the two industries that have shaped the global supply chain… Pharmaceuticals and Semiconductors.

We’ll be posting Laura’s presentation deck along with a recap of the conference, so stay tuned!

Happy Monday all!

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S&OP in Las Vegas! Let’s Learn, Laugh, and Be Entertained at the S&OP Innovation Summit

CJWehlage

SandOP in Las VegasThis past week was the IE Group’s S&OP Innovation Summit at the beautiful venue of the Bellagio in Las Vegas. Kinaxis was well represented, especially with the wonderful keynote speech from Kathleen Geraghty from Celestica. Her keynote hit the main theme of the conference: S&OP Skills. Having attended and presented at many S&OP conferences, I was expecting the standard S&OP challenges of maturity and alignment with cross functional teams. The reason I found this conference surprisingly unique, is the focus on talent and skills.

Celestica’s keynote centered on “Planning with Predictive Power”, which is done as a managed service from Celestica. Having worked many years in the supply chain with the contract manufacturing firms, I find this managed service, sometimes called PaaS (Planning-as-a-Service), extremely intriguing. The contract manufacturer, Celestica, already manages manufacturing and inventory. They are best prepared to do the planning service. Kathleen spoke about managing demand planning and scenario modeling of the Brand’s S&OP process, with the goal of improving forecast accuracy to above 85% and modeling in minutes, not days.

smarter-faster-s-and-op-cycle

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